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Thread: All-season tires?

  1. #1
    Master OptiBoarder Joann Raytar's Avatar
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    Question All-season tires?

    Hi folks,

    The tires that came with my car bit the dust and I picked up a set of Yokohama Avid H4S (AS430) for a 1997 Ford Contour SE. Anyone know how they are as far as handling and dealing with light snow or snow smoothed over by plows? So far they handle fine on dry road but ... more winter on Weds. and Fri.

    What would you have recommended?

    I thought about Michelin but some folks said the Hydroedge and X One tires have issues with snow packing into the treads. If worse comes to worse and they are sloppy in the snow I will just have to suck it up and get snow tires. Ahhh, fond memories of rolling dad's tires into the basement and back out every year and that giant jack that you had to stand up and crank.

  2. #2
    Optimentor Diane's Avatar
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    Re: All-season tires?

    Jo said:
    Hi folks,

    Ahhh, fond memories of rolling dad's tires into the basement and back out every year and that giant jack that you had to stand up and crank.
    Now Jo, darlin...please don't tell me you physically changed your own tires.

    Diane
    Anything worth doing is worth doing well.

  3. #3
    Master OptiBoarder Joann Raytar's Avatar
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    Not any more. Now I just wait 1-2 hours at Town Fair Tire and let them do it. We used to though. Dad had this jack that was about 2 1/2 feet tall that just went under the front or back bumper and a giant, star tire iron. Put some wood blocks under the opposite end and work away. Couldn't forget to put the lug nuts in the hub cap or lightening would come out of the sky if you lost them. Dad was styling with his old white walls.

    That's what children were for, manual labor. If you think changing the snowtires was bad, you should have been there for the first spring lawn mowing day. Nothing like a push mower and new, tall, damp spring grass.

    Those days were real character builders; just look at my posts and you'll see what kind of character I've become. ;)

  4. #4
    sub specie aeternitatis Pete Hanlin's Avatar
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    Help me out here... snow? Is that the chilly wet white stuff I seem to recall from my Northern days? We get something similar around these parts, but its more liquified and just soaks down into this sandy stuff that passes for dirt here.
    :D

    Seriously, we used to use my dad's snow tires and a board as a ramp for our motorcycles when we were kids. Once, my stupid brothers (well, they don't seem so stupid now, but they did growing up) used one with a nail still in it. Yep, you can guess how pleased my dad was with his perforated snow tires!

    I have two words for you, Jo- TIRE CHAINS! We have "All-Season" radials on our Expedition (Goodyears), and they are by far the loudest tire I've ever driven on. Had it in snow once (on a visit home) and they did handle well, however. I had a set of Yokohamas years ago, and they were really good tires. I also like the Cooper Cobras on my car...

    Good luck, safe driving, and- as a kid who had to push mow over an acre of grass every week in the summer- its nice to know I wasn't the only person who felt like I was in a labor camp growing up!!! (The year I went to college, my parents bought a RIDING lawn mower for my stupid brother to mow the lawn with). Grumble, grumble, grumble...
    ;)

  5. #5
    Bad address email on file Darris Chambless's Avatar
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    Think surface contact...

    ...and surface friction.

    If the tires you have don't seem to be doing what you want them to on the snow reduce the tire pressure so that more of the tire touches the surface of the snow and or ice. The more surface area on the the snow or ice the less slippage you'll have, also this will allow two different positions of flex on the tire to minimize the mount of snow packing into the tread. Snow tires or not your car will slip if conditions are right so I wouldn't worry about the Yokahama's (I run Yoka's on my dirt bike but they're knobby tires)

    Always remember, don't slam on the brake and steer into the skid, oh and stay safe.

    Take care,

    Darris C.

    PS. We had snow Saturday night. Only about a half inch and it was gone by midday Sunday when the sun came out and the temp rose to about the mid 40's. It sure was pretty to watch coming down in the street light glow.

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    Snow Tires

    Jo,

    How bout that. You get advice about snow tires from folks in Texas and Florida. Ya just got to love it.

    All you have to do is follow the advice of that gomer on the local TV station in Haatfad and "Stay Home". Of all the New England States I think CT has just about the worst snow removal. I think it has something to do with all of the Democrats.

    I used to drive to clinics in Maine & NH during blizzards and once I had hit either of those two State lines I knew that I had it made. New Hampshire knows the truth about their roads. They bring money into the State.

    I guess me ole grandpa's advice applies. . . "don't drive faster than the speed you want to hit the tree"

    Emile

  7. #7
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter varmint's Avatar
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    Well heck, I may as well through in my advice from Arizona.
    Toss a couple bags o sand in the trunk, adds weight & you can toss sand under the tires if you get a little stuck.
    Or you can move where it don't snow. It's amazing I've only bought tires twice since 1996, and thats because I like to do burnouts. I also don't have snow caked up 1"around my pant legs anymore.:D

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    Sand Bags

    Varmint,

    I think this is a front wheel drive car. As anyone knows up heyah in New Hampshire we stack the sand bags on the hood.

    Live Free or Die,

    Emile

  9. #9
    Bad address email on file Darris Chambless's Avatar
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    Laws of physics my dear Watson.

    Hey Emile,

    Sorry we southerners don't know much 'bout ice and snow. We ain't never seed any afore. :D Just kidding. We get a lot of ice storms and have even had (and I kid you not) a dust storm that came through while at the same time it started to rain and then turned to sleet. Our cars were covered with frozen mud. Let's see you NH folks top that one. ;) Although our snow season doesn't last long when it hits it gets nasty. Partly because most don't know how to drive in it and partly because since the season is so short we don't allocate money for snow removal.

    One thing we southern boys do know about is mud. Now mud is an unfriendly partner. You can't get any traction on it and can dig yourself into a hole if you get stuck. You can slide off the road or worse if you hit it the wrong way and since we have a lot of dirt roads around these things are not uncommon. Chains on the tires won't get you out, mud tires actually get you stuck faster, rear wheel drives high center when you sink, front wheel drive bury the front end, extra weight on the front or the back might help if you don't have as much swamp in front as you do behind and four wheel drives get stuck just as fast as two wheel drives if you don't know how to drive in it. If you get stuck in the mud the only thing you can effectively do to get out is to raise the vehicle and put something under the tires for traction (you can imagine how hard it is to raise a car with a jack in mud that you just sank a car in. It isn't easy or fun but it's not as cold as snow during most seasons.

    You have snow we have mud. It's slippery and can ruin your day but you can build a house out of both :D

    Take care,

    Darris C.

  10. #10
    Master OptiBoarder Joann Raytar's Avatar
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    Emile,

    You're not kidding. Some downs have rules against using salt, it messes up the lawns. One town has decided that sand and molasses create adequate traction. Hmmm, I bet the car wash guys love getting the molasses and hot wax mix out of their filters. The newest attempt at snow removal, and from the looks of it most expensive, is one of those giant snow blowers they use up in Canada. A huge snow blower shoots the snow into a dump truck attached behind it. I figure he probably only has to empty the snow every twenty minutes.

    The new tires did work great on dry road today. A flat bed lost a four foot long sack of something in the middle of a winding back road; the car stopped on a dime this morning.

    Pete, I bet you were the TV remote control as well.

  11. #11
    OptiWizard
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    Jo,
    I grew up in northeast Ohio's snowbelt. I know snow!
    My Ohio driveway was almost 175 feet long but was layed and landscaped perfectly (not my doing, the man who built the house in 1948 knew what he was doing). The winds caused the snow to drift alng a hedge line about 15 feet from the drive, I had to clear only the front of the garage and the apron of the street.
    A passed down old trick was to throw out grass seed on any ice patches that the drive or sidewalk developed. You have great footing and reseed your lawn edges without ever trying.
    Never had trouble with FWD GM cars in the snow. I used to try and bury the 89 LeSabre in heavy snow, it was a tank, nothing stopped it. I buy Goodyear all season tires. I really like the Conquest radial that is out now. I think the last snow tire I bought was in 1972!
    Jim
    Jim Schafer
    Retired From PPG Industries/
    Transitions Optical, Inc.

    When you win, say nothing. When you lose, say even less.
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