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Thread: X, Y, and Z

  1. #1
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    X, Y, and Z

    OK, essilor reps seen today. There has been, I've noted, a foray into "depth of focus" a lot, lately.

    For context, we've had EDOF ("extended depth of focus") technology FOREVER, but we've been calling it aspheric multifocal contacts. Unilens, Conforma and David Volk started it before my time, and B&L bought it (I think that's right). Essentially it's a "low asphericity" conical section multifocal and they use the daylights out of it in RGPs and SCLs, now.

    THEN the big hot thing was to incorporate it into IOLs, and after decades, ophthalmology is touting how great EDOF is. (Yawn. But correct.)

    SO NOW recently it seems that the lens companies are figuring out ways to make such asphericity part of the lens design. I don't understand--because of marketing mumbo-jumbo because apparently the reps are too stupid and we're too stupid to be talked to any other way--but it seems that some/all points within the corridor and near zone have extended depth of focus (due to this asphericity, I think). The benefit touted is that the patient has more play in depth of focus at a given head angle/lens location and won't feel such a need to look up and down the corridor.

    The way I think of it, is that while Varilux has done quite a yeoman's job of smoothing out peripheral astigmatism in the X and Y coordinates (that is, on the lens surface) now they're smoothing in the Z axis, back-and-forth or "in-and-out".

    Question 1: Anyone have insight on this?
    Q2: Am I getting this right?
    Q3: Does this work?
    Q4: What would we give up? I'm thinking "soft focus = low contrast or less clear".

    I'm pretty sure I've heard of this approach from Zeiss or Shamir, too?
    Last edited by drk; 01-19-2023 at 03:52 PM.

  2. #2
    Compulsive Truthteller OptiBoard Gold Supporter Uncle Fester's Avatar
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    Will Pete Hanlin risk the lions den?

    Haven't heard from him in a while.

  3. #3
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    His name was brought up by the field rep...

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  4. #4
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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  5. #5
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Evaluating lens performance using “volume of acuity”


    « Researchers introduced a new concept: the “volume of acuity” needed for comfortable vision. That refers to the volume of space that a wearer can perceive through the lens with the necessary visual acuity to perform typical tasks at each distance. »
    To evaluate the performance of the Varilux® X seriesTM progressive lens, researchers introduced a new concept: the “volume of acuity” needed for comfortable vision. That refers to the volume of space that a wearer can perceive through the lens with the necessary visual acuity to perform typical tasks at each distance: reading with near vision, looking at a computer screen with arm’s-length vision, deciphering text with intermediate vision, etc. That volume, which had only rarely been identified in the past, indicates the wearer’s three-dimensional area of clear vision, with specific attention to the depth of the wearer’s field of vision.Thus, if we compare the volume of acuity obtained with the Varilux® X seriesTM lens with that of an earlier progressive lens, we see (as shown in Figure 6) that the volume of vision is considerably enlarged both in width and depth, especially in the area of so-called arm’s- length vision. The XtendTM technology makes it possible to maintain visual acuity at a higher level than the threshold previously defined (0.15 Log MAR at 70 cm), with the result that wearers enjoy a significantly larger area of clear vision.



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  7. #7
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    I read that "paper" carefully. It's crap. It's mumbo-jumbo.

    As far as I can tell, they perhaps made the lens a little more "V-shaped" (meaning they widened the intermediate zone) and probably they changed the rate of progression through the corridor to make the intermediate more useable on a desktop (but we know that's quixotic).

    What I was interested in was this "Extend technology" and it barely discusses it.

  8. #8
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    I've heard similar things about Varilux X in particular. Despite my effort, I have also been unable to get any straight answers on how this actually works, not for lack of trying.

    I've dispensed many many Varilux X jobs and although it's hard to say with any certainty, my inclination is that this Extend Technology probably doesn't amount to much. Would love to hear about this from somebody who's in the know though!

  9. #9
    OptiWizard
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    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post
    OK, essilor reps seen today.
    You must be the lens rep's worst nightmare LOL. You should just ask to have Pete Hanlin call you at your office ^_^

    Curious to hear the answers to your questions as well.

  10. #10
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    They're very nice but Essilor is pehaps the worst at marketing-speak that means absolutely nothing. They try to dazzle you and you're supposed to say "OK, I guess. I'm an essilor Expert, now."

    It's sad the industry doesn't respect/encourage/educate their REAL customers: optical people. They seem to have a low opinion of us, like we're consumers. Save the jazz for the consumers.

  11. #11
    OptiWizard
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    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post
    They're very nice but Essilor is pehaps the worst at marketing-speak that means absolutely nothing. They try to dazzle you and you're supposed to say "OK, I guess. I'm an essilor Expert, now."

    It's sad the industry doesn't respect/encourage/educate their REAL customers: optical people. They seem to have a low opinion of us, like we're consumers. Save the jazz for the consumers.
    Most of the reps I have seen for lens companies aren't former opticians but sales people. They don't understand the lenses well enough from a technical standpoint to tell us anything more than the marketing mumbo jumbo. This lens has wavefront technology... cool. What is that and how is it different from what Zeiss/Hoya/Shamir offer? This lens has path optimization! Okay, but really any lens with a baby add power will be optimized right? So how is this lens different from an older generation progressive with a small add? They just look at me with a blank face.

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