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Thread: Checking PALs

  1. #1
    Rising Star
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    Checking PALs

    When a patient off of the street comes in a with a random pair of PALs, how do you all check the Rx? How am I supposed to know where all of the markings are if I don't have all of the templates? Thanks.

  2. #2
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Just guess. You can dot their eyes and read.

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    Compulsive Truthteller OptiBoard Gold Supporter Uncle Fester's Avatar
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    Last edited by Uncle Fester; 05-13-2022 at 03:45 PM.

  4. #4
    Master OptiBoarder
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    I agree with drk's instruction. I would only like to add:

    Please do that, with their eyeglasses on!
    Eyes wide open

  5. #5
    OptiBoard Professional KrystleClear's Avatar
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    If you're just talking about verifying whether the correct lens powers were made per the script - do you have a manual lensometer or a digital lensometer? Most digital lensometers have a PAL setting that kind of directs you where you need to move the lens to get the powers. You can always dot over their pupils while they have them on for the OCs and use that to guide you. A lot of people poo poo digital lensometers because they aren't always as precise as using a manual lensometer, but when you're not experienced with it, it's better than fumbling around with the manual not knowing what you're doing and it's faster (until you get more used to the manual lensometer). The progressive corridor is inset a few millimeters nasally, so when you move the lens around to check the add, remember to move the lens in that direction. I'm not 100% sure if this is what you were asking about but, yeah. You kind of just do the same thing you would do to verify that your own orders were made correctly, just without the lab markings on the lens. You should also be able to see the PAL watermarks designating the add on the temporal side of the lens.

    I also highly recommend Laramy-K. The Youtube videos are free but the subscription is worth it for the text lessons. I have worked in eyecare since 2011 but no one ever properly trained me or explained any of this stuff to me. When I was "promoted" from pre-exam tech to optician at my previous office, they had a sink or swim approach where you just had to fend for yourself. No one took the time to explain any of the concepts, formulas, etc to me. I learned from watching the other opticians and from making mistakes. I quit, then later came back to the industry and now I am back selling glasses. I have relied heavily on Laramy-K. Everything is explained in a way that is much easier to understand than just reading Systems for Ophthalmic Dispensing, which I also use. Studying for my ABO and trying to get a grip on all this math stuff we need to know.
    Krystle

  6. #6
    Master OptiBoarder
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    What do you mean you don't know where the markings are? They are engraved on the lenses 34mm apart. Almost all PALs use a 4 drop and the DRP is just above the fitting cross. Zeiss uses a 6 drop, and Seiko lenses use a zero drop.

  7. #7
    Compulsive Truthteller OptiBoard Gold Supporter Uncle Fester's Avatar
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    We were all Neophyte at one point...

    Quote Originally Posted by Kwill212 View Post
    What do you mean you don't know where the markings are?.......
    The posters name says it all so, granted, optician (even a neophyte) might be premature from this question, kwill.

    Accordingly, I'd still prefer we embrace, like other licensed professions, a designation of optical apprentice, journey person optician or master optician and answer the question the way we have.

    fwiw New Hampshire is an unlicensed State.

    Keep posting Neo! Many lurkers benefit from these simple questions when learning the ropes.

  8. #8
    Master OptiBoarder
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Fester View Post
    The posters name says it all so, granted, optician (even a neophyte) might be premature from this question, kwill.
    They have been posting on optiboard since 2005, I don't think their user name is relevant anymore. 17 years and they don't know the basics of PALs and lensometry? Give me a break. I live and work in an unlicensed state. These are the people that call me asking me to troubleshoot glasses they made for someone who previously got glasses from me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Fester View Post
    Accordingly, I'd still prefer we embrace, like other licensed professions, a designation of optical apprentice, journey person optician or master optician and answer the question the way we have.
    That's all well and good(and I believe is the case in a state or two) but to pretend that is going to happen across the board is lunacy. Apprentices in other profession are not expected to have a great level of knowledge, and accordingly, are not allowed to preform many tasks until they are. This is clearly not what is happening here, or across the industry. The inmates are running the asylum. One book Fester, they can't be bothered to read one. simple. book. System for Ophthalmic Dispensing and they are more than half way to being an decent optician.

    Also, I did answer the question so...

  9. #9
    OptiBoardaholic
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    Nothing we do is rocket science. Just take everything one step at a time.

    I ask to borrow their glasses, I dot up the engravings and use a progressive layout chart. Again like Kwill said almost all PALs are 4 drop, but if you want to know for sure use the progressive identifier:

    https://epic.thevisioncouncil.org/

    I will then look at the glasses in the lensometer and write down the Rx. Next I want to make sure the progressive is in the right place for the customer to see. You can see the layout that you marked up on the glasses and see if their pupil is looking dead on through it. If it doesn't line up, I will mark where their eye sits (middle of pupil) and then take some new PD's.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3I57YY0vnk

    John really does a great job explaining things, you should check him out.

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