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Thread: Glass anyone?

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter
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    Glass anyone?

    I'm considering buying a new edger. One of the edgers I'm considering can be fit with a glass roughing wheel. The questions are, how much demand for glass is there presently, and is the demand likely to increase for any reason, be it new types of glass (e.g.: Gorilla Glass) or anything else?

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    We send out the very few glass jobs. Remember, after edging you will need to tempter the glass, either heat or chemical temper and the do a drop ball test.

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    OptiBoard Professional IIxIPariahIxII's Avatar
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    If it'll save some money, I'd say leave the glass to your outside lab. I see MAYBE one glass order a year, maybe 2 years. And it'll take you more time and equipment to do it right.

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    I'm lucky if I order 1 glass order a year! Remember if you plan to use the same edger for glass and for another material, you have to change everything out so it doesn't scratch the next set of lenses. Most labs will have one edger for just glass and do not switch out because it's a pain. And yes, don't forget about tempering!

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter
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    Quote Originally Posted by mervinek View Post
    I'm lucky if I order 1 glass order a year! Remember if you plan to use the same edger for glass and for another material, you have to change everything out so it doesn't scratch the next set of lenses. Most labs will have one edger for just glass and do not switch out because it's a pain. And yes, don't forget about tempering!
    I use direct water -- no recirculating -- so going from material to material shouldn't be a problem. I actually already own an edger that could be used only or mostly for glass, but there are two spaces where I edge. The advantage of having two glass-capable edgers is I can cut glass in either space. The downsides are the glass wheel will cost an extra $500, and while the plastic roughing wheel can be flipped when one side of the wheel wears out, that can only be done if there's no glass wheel also.

    There was a time when I thought it would be good to sell glass because none of the other offices in my area do it, but processing glass is a pain in the ***. That said, just as I've gotten much better at Chemistrie clips and Lindberg rimless, I'm sure I could get better at working with glass with practice.

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    Master OptiBoarder optical24/7's Avatar
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    Jefe, Jefe….Let me talk you off this ledge…

    1st, in 2022, you will never pay for the investment. There are sooo many things..1st, you can’t use the same edger, even with direct water, glass shards are everywhere. You’ll also need a retaining system for the glass slurry. It’s like thick sand. You need a drop ball, documentation, (extra liability). A Tempering machine ( as mentioned) and go thru the learning curve of the different temp/time for every lens (thickness, PGX, tints..) all require different times/temps.

    If a lens has been tempered, and you have to resize it by hand stoning, you have to re-temper ( you’ve disturbed the surface tension of the previously tempered lens)…

    You say you already got an edger that you could convert to glass. If you can sell that much glass today, max that one out 1st before committing you new edger to + glass. You’d be better served in investing in a trivex wheel on the new and sell more trivex. The benefits of trivex are superior to glass in most modern eyewear worn today. Easier to sell the benefits over glass. ( UV, impact resistance, weight, optics, ect.)..

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    Eyes eastward... Uilleann's Avatar
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    $500 for the wheel alone, in addition to all the equipment needed for termpering, drop ball etc...how many glass jobs will you need to run to break even? To turn a profit? Will you live that long? ;)

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    A few years ago, I acquired about 60,000 finished glass lenses. While most of them aren't the sort of size necessary for today's large frames (50-55 mm blanks), many are still usable. There are all sorts of colors and a wide range of powers. There are even some finished bifocal lenses with the smallest segments I've ever seen.

    I think about those lenses in storage as I'm considering whether or not to get that glass wheel.

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    OptiBoardaholic KrystleClear's Avatar
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    I have had about two or three glass orders since February of 2021. I seldom get requests for it anymore. I thought it would be more frequent as my patients are older, but even they've moved on. It's only the occasional older gentleman who is resistant to change and likes glass for the scratch resistance. They always have big honkin aviator frames too. I can only imagine how heavy that is on your nose.
    Krystle

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    Quote Originally Posted by KrystleClear View Post
    I have had about two or three glass orders since February of 2021. I seldom get requests for it anymore. I thought it would be more frequent as my patients are older, but even they've moved on. It's only the occasional older gentleman who is resistant to change and likes glass for the scratch resistance. They always have big honkin aviator frames too. I can only imagine how heavy that is on your nose.

    Yes, it seems that aviator shapes are popular with the glass-loving folks.

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