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Thread: Blue blockers for night driving.

  1. #1
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Blue blockers for night driving.

    Check this out:

    https://cocoonseyewear.com/twilight-...ving-fitovers/

    Then look at this. Go down to the Specialty Lenses section, and tab between the "night driving" and the "computer" lens specifications.

    https://cocoonseyewear.com/lenses/

    They are one in the same.


    Hey, is this a good idea?

  2. #2
    Ghost in the OptiMachine Quince's Avatar
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    What it looks like to me is straight up BluTech. Which would make sense because those the the applications that they are most effective for. (She said, while wearing BluTech lenses....)

    The problem I see, is if someone is wearing these over non AR glasses. I've always been partial to the analogy that wearing glasses while driving is like having a second windshield for light to get trapped on if not coated. If someone wears these over nonAR lenses, how effective are they vs. someone wearing coated lenses?

    The tint itself is where they have included the blue blocker, so that will minimize the color on the lens vs. the color looking through. The graphs are identical so I assume there can't actually be a difference in density or hue, or there would be notable change in the filter.

    Personally, I think this looks plenty effective though it is being marketed in a strange way. The pros are weighed heavily against it being in a fit over frame. They offer all the time benefits (indoor and outdoor) while being in a clunky frame meant for temporary wear. It feels like they had an opportunity and took it but don't quite have a target audience for this specific version of product.

    Ultimately, as an advocate for Blutech, I'm in favor of anything that offers the same comfort I'm sure these "Polare" lenses offer.
    Have I told you today how much I hate poly?

  3. #3
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    I think that's a good point, and that's kind of what I was thinking, too.

    If we can establish that blocking/reflecting a small sliver of blue will enhance night driving for people with, say, minimal cataracts, then we have a new application for these blue blocker coatings.

    We have to test it! Who's old enough?

  4. #4
    Ghost in the OptiMachine Quince's Avatar
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    Well, there is your target audience!

    Suggest for patients who have expressed issues with night driving/ computer who have starting cataracts and see what happens.

    My reasoning for supporting this product is based purely in comfort. Though I have a hard time believing any blue-blocker could be doing damage, I'm hesitant to advertise the health benefits because of the mass contradictory hype out there. For most people, comfort is enough (who doesn't want less eye strain??) but I wish I did have the ability to conduct such studies. If I ever work for a Doc it will have to be someone invested in the long-term advancements of their patients.

    jarralad2 might have some opinions on that, should he stumble across this thread.
    Have I told you today how much I hate poly?

  5. #5
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    Ok - lets start with blue blocking lenses.
    1st they don't block blue entirely, they block a proportion of the blue generally at the end of the spectrum.
    If you want a real blue blocker they will appear yellow - and yellow/ orange lenses are often used (controversially) for night driving.
    THere are a number of different effects of using a blue blocker -
    so
    High intensity long term blue light has been implicated in retinal protein denaturing, but the jury is still out on how much and for how long. There are possible associations with diet.
    Blue / yellow light relationships have been implicated in circadian rhythm difficulties although the research I did for a lighting company showed individual variations which suggested individual tolerances vary significantly and in some cases the effects were reversed
    Magnocellular processing and dorsal stream effects are affected by affected by both blue and yellow. This can have implications in flicker fusion, movement detection and movement instigation. Obviously this can have importance in driving.
    Structurally the retina has less blue receptors towards the periphery but whether this is of importance is not known, although retinal information flow and fusional areas may be affected.
    Psychophysical performance may be affected.
    Feedback and feedforward may be affected although this is not certain and research is limited.
    Dispersion may affect refractive error, so blue absorption may result in a reduced colour spread. In the end, the optometric refraction has to be a best guess as it is only completely accurate in monochromatic light. Red light requires lower energy levels. This can be important in tint prescribing.
    In addition blue light requires a higher energy to produce effect, there are different relationships between yellow and blue depending on source energy.
    The colour pathways transmit information to the brain at different speeds. This too can be critical for some during night driving.
    Following the physical you need to consider cognitive effects of colour. Sympathetic and parasympathetic relationships may be modified.
    Every part of the visual system can be affected - V1 - V6, the limbic system can be modified, somatosensory systems etc.
    There is evidence that eye movement, accommodation and convergence is affected. Dissociation can sometimes result.
    Of course the research is difficult to access, but there is a lot around, often not obvious.
    Then we have cognitive effects, effects due to dispersion (cataract and scarring) - blue may be needed rather than reduced, physiological responses etc.
    Ther are cross sensory effects, timing and integration responses due to information flow, and to make it more complex there is an individual element. Simultagnosia, glare, image fragmentation and more are important. We looked at brain arousal, alpha frequencies in the occipital cortex were affected in some cases but the efffects may be opposite! Migraines often require the red / blue relationship to be modified and there is evidence that various pathways are affected. Its complex, but fascinating and the surface has only been touched. `Visual stimulus is often more inmportant than the refraction and can be used to stop numerous symptoms. To my knowledge there are reserach and developments going on to use visual stimulus modification in treating medical conditions, whether they get to market is another matter, but they show syesthetic effects of visual input. An obvious one would be epilepsy - visual input often triggers it - and using the fl 41 lens was suggested - we would use individually prescribed filters as they work much better - but the research has not been done - so it has to be classed as experimental. And when you go to special needs, you can get some amazing effects with blue - beneficial or adverse! In the end - the stimulus is part of an optical professionals remit, they should completely understand tints filters and lighting, their uses, how to recognise when they should be considered, assessment techniques and prescribing protocols.
    Last edited by jarralad2; 05-11-2021 at 02:52 AM.

  6. #6
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    This is just such a cool website for researching effects of mirrors/tints/ etc.

    https://cocoonseyewear.com/lenses/

  7. #7
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Dang it, I'm getting old.

    I find myself strangely attracted to Rockports, Buicks and fitovers.

  8. #8
    Master OptiBoarder optical24/7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post
    Dang it, I'm getting old.

    I find myself strangely attracted to Rockports, Buicks and fitovers.

    Don’t worry doc, I’m putting in a sort of Shady Rest for old OD’s on my back forty. Enjoy nature and a non stressed life, off the grid, living in a tree house! (....ok, it’s a deer stand...but it’s insulated with real cardboard!)

  9. #9
    Rising Star
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    Sounds lovely - me, I live in a village in north eastern england - village green, roman fort, medieval church, lots of lovely walks - yet i still like the idea of going off grid. A haunch of venison sounds good too. Forget eyes and lenses!

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