Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: sugeestions please

  1. #1
    Rising Star
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Ayr
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    66

    sugeestions please

    I have over a number of years made what is likely to be the most comprehensive and extensive video collection of the effects of tints and filters in the world.

    I have now decided that it is about time I shared this resource, but it needs extensive work on cataloguing and prioritising.

    It has many controversial areas, some of which I consider of international importance - if they are true then some areas of optics require a radical re-evaluation.

    So, what does it have in it?

    It really consists of a number of areas, patient observations, tests, videos of effects that can be seen etc.

    These include some very unusual conditions.

    There are effects in virtually every area of optometry, medicine and psychology.

    Unusual conditions include Capgrass syndrome, McGurk Effect, prosopagnosia, metamorphopsia, paiinopsia, Balints syndrome, simultagnosia, teleopsia, macropsia, micropsia, The Alice in Wnderland effect, timing and mapping problems, synesthesia, The Pulfrich effect and much more.

    There are videos that show potential binocular vision effects that have not been noted and potential clinical implications.


    There is just so much!

    So, what do you think is the best thing to do with this resource?

    Suggestions welcome.

    Obviously I could do it myself. But this is much bigger than that.


    My course in tint prescribing is now available for those that want a taster - and will provide a low cost introduction to this complex area in optics - If you are interested in learning about tints and filters - if you use the promo code "professional discount" there is a 25% reduction in the already low cost

    https://sensoryprocessingcentre.myec...t/full-course/

  2. #2
    Master OptiBoarder
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Occupation
    Optical Laboratory Technician
    Posts
    851
    Depends what you want from it but YouTube would make it the most accessible...

  3. #3
    Rising Star
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Ayr
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    66
    thanks - but it needs a lot of referencing cross referencing - videos need editing, there is around 200 hrs of video - past experience suggests it takes around an hour per minute to do everything necessary (someone with knowledge of videos probably would be a lot faster)
    I was thinking it would be a phenomenol PhD project or a university may wish to take control - providing they are prepared to do the work - happy to pass them on. If i do it all it suggests around 12 000 hours of work - am i prepared to do it? at 30 hrs per week - thats around 400 weeks work - 8 years! I am sure you understand why i would be would be delighted to pass it on!

  4. #4
    Ghost in the OptiMachine Quince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Sebago ME
    Occupation
    Optical Laboratory Technician
    Posts
    1,088
    It sounds like a heck of a project. As someone who is fascinated by color perception and deficiency, as well as its effects on the brain, I think we should talk. Sounds like this would be a team effort though, which is why I've chosen to make my interest public.

    A couple key points to solidify: What is the purpose of this film? Who is the target audience?
    It sounds to be educational though my understanding of color research is that it is often met with hard skepticism.

    That being said, I have no doubt your research is well documented and thorough. A look at the website link provided would back that you have many ventures relating to this project.

    As someone looking forward to focusing on color therapy for my masters certification, I'd love to have a hand in this, though I am but one. In the past I have made short documentaries and wedding videos but do not currently work in video editing. Unfortunately, I see myself as unfit to tackle the entirety of the project but would absolutely be onboard for lending a helping hand.
    Have I told you today how much I hate poly?

  5. #5
    Rising Star
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Ayr
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    66
    send me your email address and i will send you some info - it is a fascinating area

  6. #6
    Master OptiBoarder
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Mitten State
    Occupation
    Ophthalmic Technician
    Posts
    616
    Quote Originally Posted by jarralad2 View Post
    ...There are effects in virtually every area of optometry, medicine and psychology.

    Unusual conditions include Capgrass syndrome...
    As someone with an MA in psychology, I have to say that I find the potential for any tint or filter to have any impact on Capgras Syndrome (this is the proper spelling) to be essentially absurd. Capgras syndrome is an organic disorder, caused by either temporary dysfunction or permanent damage to neurological structures, commonly by a neurodegenerative syndrome, chronic disorder of neurological etiology, or physical trauma to the brain. The only known treatment that has worked in some situations for this rare disorder is antipsychotics and extensive interpersonal therapy.

    I am also quite circumspect of the ability for any filter or tint to have any significant effect on Prosopagnosia. Several of the other syndromes you mentioned are also known to be neurological in origin and it is highly doubtful that any filter or tint would have absolutely any impact on the severity of the syndrome or disease.
    Last edited by Lelarep; 11-26-2020 at 01:06 AM.

  7. #7
    Rising Star
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Ayr
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    66
    I agree this is the current thinking - but it is wrong. Or else the videos I have put together are wrong. Over 100 of them!
    Whoops spelling though on Capgras - you are right. Capgras is an unusual and rare processing problem, related to prosopagnosia, but different as it appears that the amygdala is involved, which may at least in some cases be modified by visual input. It may well be that you are right in some cases, but there are undoubtedly other potential presentations.
    Prosopagnosia can be divided into two basic types (with many subgroups), one in which recognition is essentially a memory difficulty, the other which responds extremely well to filters. This is the type usually found in autism, and my belief is that it should be treated optometrically. My course has a large number of videos of it, and i find it sad that it is not routinely treated. Prosopmetamorphopsia is also common. The psychological model of facial recognition problems has significant difficulties when it is caused by visual input, but that's for the future.
    It is perhaps a direct result of psychological interests that some visual problems have not been addressed, and the lack of training in the effects of tints and filters by the optical professions. It has to change.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OptiBoard is proudly sponsored by:
Younger Optics and Vision Equipment