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Thread: ARC Coatings and Computer Reflection

  1. #1
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    ARC Coatings and Computer Reflection

    Recently, I started working as a sales associate at a local optical store. It has been difficult trying to work during the pandemic, but I've been greatly enjoying the experience and working with all the patients.

    The business has declined as a result of COVID, and the owner cut our optician's hours and I barely see her. As a result it has been difficult to get answers to the patients' questions.

    This site has been an amazing resource for me since I started working in the optical field. I'm hoping I might be able to get some help answering a common patient question.

    Many of our patients are working from home and using Zoom to take calls. Several have complained that they are seeing the reflection of the computer screen in their image on the Zoom call. The customers don't have glare, and do not notice the reflection until they see their faces on the Zoom call. However, the reflection is very prominent and some of their colleagues complain it is distracting. Most patients say the reflection is green in color.

    I took a look at the customers' files, and all of them have some type of ARC coating on their glasses (most have Crizal Avance, but some have Crizal Alize).

    Do you know why this is happening, and if there is anything we can do to solve the problem? Would remaking the glasses using Crizal Sapphire or a different ARC coating solve the problem?

    Note that most of my customers have Davis, so we are limited in using many "high-end" ARC coatings.

  2. #2
    OptiBoard Professional Mauro.Airoldi's Avatar
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    AR is, as the name implies, a treatment that reduces the reflex but does not eliminate it.
    the fact of noticing this reflection on the lenses during a teleconference depends on the shape (curve) of the glasses and mainly on the presence of light sources that are reflected in the lens and therefore is read by the camera.
    simple solution, reduce the brightness of the lamp or change the angle of incidence (just rotate the desk a few degrees).
    one type of AR or another does not vary much the problem

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    Compulsive Truthteller OptiBoard Gold Supporter Uncle Fester's Avatar
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    A deep dive on AR.

    Note Esiilors guru Pete Hanlon's post #8:

    https://www.optiboard.com/forums/sho...ual+reflection

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mauro.Airoldi View Post
    AR is, as the name implies, a treatment that reduces the reflex but does not eliminate it.
    the fact of noticing this reflection on the lenses during a teleconference depends on the shape (curve) of the glasses and mainly on the presence of light sources that are reflected in the lens and therefore is read by the camera.
    simple solution, reduce the brightness of the lamp or change the angle of incidence (just rotate the desk a few degrees).
    one type of AR or another does not vary much the problem
    +1 agreed

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    So, reduce the brightness of the LCD screen. Makes sense to me.

    Would adding a polarized filter to the camera help? (I'm think yes, since the reflection should be unpolarized light. One would probably need to provide ample ambient light to compensate for the loss due to polarization, but it should be a simple task to do so.)
    Last edited by Lelarep; 07-29-2020 at 12:44 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelarep View Post
    Would adding a polarized filter to the camera help? (I'm think yes, since the reflection should be unpolarized light. One would probably need to provide ample ambient light to compensate for the loss due to polarization, but it should be a simple task to do so.)
    The average persons webcam setup usually does not allow for adding filters. Cheap polarizing filters for smartphones/tablets might add an undesirable colorcast that might be more annoying than the reflections.

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    A simple polarizing film should just reduce the incoming light, which one could compensate for. I don't see why it would produce a colorcast since all it is doing is polarizing the light. Humans, and a camera, would both perceive polarizing film as a neutral gray due to light intensity reduction, compared to the same image without the film present.

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    OptiBoard Professional Mauro.Airoldi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelarep View Post
    A simple polarizing film should just reduce the incoming light, which one could compensate for. I don't see why it would produce a colorcast since all it is doing is polarizing the light. Humans, and a camera, would both perceive polarizing film as a neutral gray due to light intensity reduction, compared to the same image without the film present.
    this is not the case, the molecules that give polarization have the characteristic of absorbing a little light on all angles anyway. if you accept a 95% polarization on 90 ° angles, you will still have a generic light absorption effect of the average of 35/50%
    we also consider that commercially the polarized product is expressly sold for sun lens use. therefore the target is precisely that of a lens with a high absorption of light (75/85%), while commercial products have not been studied for indoor use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mauro.Airoldi View Post
    this is not the case, the molecules that give polarization have the characteristic of absorbing a little light on all angles anyway. if you accept a 95% polarization on 90 ° angles, you will still have a generic light absorption effect of the average of 35/50%
    we also consider that commercially the polarized product is expressly sold for sun lens use. therefore the target is precisely that of a lens with a high absorption of light (75/85%), while commercial products have not been studied for indoor use.
    Um, I'm talking about a polarizing film like one would put on a computer screen, not a lens.

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