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Thread: Poly for the win?

  1. #51
    Eyes eastward... Uilleann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert_S View Post
    Poly is 'stronger' in a totally insignificant way...
    And by extension - physics and basic math equally shows that Trivex is optically "superior" in a totally insignificant way as well.



    PPG must have given free packets of Kool-Aid with every pair when it first launched! LOL
    Last edited by Uilleann; 02-18-2020 at 03:58 PM.

  2. #52
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    [QUOTE=Barry Santini;557782]I agree poly has improved over the decades.
    But CR39 has not. In fact, its quality has decreased to the point that I will not use it unless I absolutely have to.


    Barry...….curious as to what your normal go to material is?

    Regards,
    Golfnorth

  3. #53
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter Barry Santini's Avatar
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    I stock:
    Essilor AR poly (EAAR)
    Essilor poly (EAA)
    Hoya Phoenix EX3 (trivex)
    Zeiss Duravision Blu Protect (Poly version)

    I order surfaced:
    Poly
    Trivex
    1.60
    CR39
    1.67
    1.74
    In that order.

    B

  4. #54
    Master OptiBoarder CCGREEN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert_S View Post
    What is fear mongering about stating facts? Trivex is optically better, lighter, less chemically reactive and stronger than poly and therefore preferential in almost all cases. Doesn't mean poly is going to kill anyone, but then neither is not having AR.

    Part of our role as optical professionals is to drive the standard of our industry forward.
    I have yet to ever pick up a trivex lens of equal size, thickness and power and find it to be lighter in weight then poly.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by lensmanmd View Post
    You do understand that
    167 has a higher specific gravity than Poly, fight me.
    167 has a higher specific gravity than CR39, fight me.
    167 is not much better in terms of ABBE over Poly, fight me.
    167 has a higher cost to the patient than poly, fight me.
    Unless the frame calls for a groove/drill/safety needs, CR39 is optically better than everything but glass, fight me.
    CR39 and Poly are the most cost effective material for the consumer, fight me.
    167 is not a miracle material. 174 is not a miracle material. The only miracle? They improve your average sale, in turn, your paycheck. They do not improve the bottom line of any business. They should be used only when the RX calls for it, not for every RX.
    Every material has its place in our industry. The key is to understand when and why to advise the patient based on their needs, not yours. Fight me.
    The majority of what you state I agree with. I don't think anyone was calling the 1.67 a miracle material and while it may not be much better in terms of it's ABBE value, I have never gotten complaints against 1.67 with regards to visual issues like I've received with Polycarbonate. While CR-39 and Polycarbonate may be the most cost effective solution for a patient, that does not make it the right solution for every customer especially when getting into higher prescriptions. Cost does not enter my mind when helping a customer pick out frames or their lenses unless they make it known that cost is an issue.

  6. #56
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter lensmanmd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pneese View Post
    The majority of what you state I agree with. I don't think anyone was calling the 1.67 a miracle material and while it may not be much better in terms of it's ABBE value, I have never gotten complaints against 1.67 with regards to visual issues like I've received with Polycarbonate. While CR-39 and Polycarbonate may be the most cost effective solution for a patient, that does not make it the right solution for every customer especially when getting into higher prescriptions. Cost does not enter my mind when helping a customer pick out frames or their lenses unless they make it known that cost is an issue.
    Thank you.
    Too many “opticians” only see higher indices and expect them to be better, with zero to little knowledge of the actual properties of the material.
    High index means I can sell a bigger frame. No. I see this everyday.
    Understanding the pros and cons of every material, every frame/lens combo is all I’m asking.
    I bend light. That is what I do.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by lensmanmd View Post
    Thank you.
    Too many “opticians” only see higher indices and expect them to be better, with zero to little knowledge of the actual properties of the material.
    High index means I can sell a bigger frame. No. I see this everyday.
    Understanding the pros and cons of every material, every frame/lens combo is all I’m asking.
    Absolutely, it's our job to delve deeper into the needs of the customer to ensure a proper fit, etc. I do my best to make sure a customer's frame does not have too much decentration even with a 1.67 because thick lenses are still thick.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak47 View Post
    I will less than respectfully disagree. Whoever is selling that information is either clueless or full of sh*t. Poly has its place, and is the best choice in a few, select situations. Nine times out of ten it is absolutely not the BEST choice. But, if you want your clientele to become frustrated when their lenses chip and crack, please use poly. They will then become your former clientele.
    +1

  9. #59
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    > But, if you want your clientele to become frustrated when their lenses chip and crack, please use poly. They will then become your former clientele.

    Classic mistake of associating a product with the business/service. If you sold the glasses and they chipped and the customer is blaming you or your business enough to not come back, you deserve to be out of business. It means you are providing no value customers. All the value is PERCEIVED to be in the product. If the product is bad, you are bad.

    IMHO That's a horrible way to run a retail establishment.
    Vitor Pamplona
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  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by vfpamp View Post
    > But, if you want your clientele to become frustrated when their lenses chip and crack, please use poly. They will then become your former clientele.

    Classic mistake of associating a product with the business/service. If you sold the glasses and they chipped and the customer is blaming you or your business enough to not come back, you deserve to be out of business. It means you are providing no value customers. All the value is PERCEIVED to be in the product. If the product is bad, you are bad.

    IMHO That's a horrible way to run a retail establishment.
    +1

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by vfpamp View Post
    > But, if you want your clientele to become frustrated when their lenses chip and crack, please use poly. They will then become your former clientele.

    Classic mistake of associating a product with the business/service. If you sold the glasses and they chipped and the customer is blaming you or your business enough to not come back, you deserve to be out of business. It means you are providing no value customers. All the value is PERCEIVED to be in the product. If the product is bad, you are bad.

    IMHO That's a horrible way to run a retail establishment.
    Sounds like something someone who has never worked in retail would say. The vast majority of the general public doesn't care about the why, the how, or your "added value". Cost, product, convince, all rank higher to most people in a retail setting. This is coming from someone who owns a very small relationship, type of business. I imagine in a high volume retail setting it is even more skewed.

    Further, as an optician or a as customer, I would 100% blame the optician for chipped lenses if they used a material they knew could chip or crack in my glasses when there were better options for the application available. I don't care how good my optician is as replacing chipped lenses. I do care that the optician is smart enough to make glasses with lenses that won't chip the first time.

    Let's say you got new tires on your car. You get a flat 2 weeks later and the store replaces it at no charge. Great. 3 weeks later you get a flat on another tire. You go in understandably upset. You speak with the manger who informs you that they are sorry about these tires not working out for you, but they can be predisposed to blowing out on your type of vehicle. Then asks if you would like to get the type of tires that won't blowout on your type of vehicle. You would be ok with this? Are you joking? I would be justifiably irate.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwill212 View Post
    Sounds like something someone who has never worked in retail would say.
    I worked 3 years in retail. Made many mistakes like these. I still do. I know exactly how hard this is. Not everyone can do. Very, very few can do it, effectively, all the time.

    Cost, product and convenience are all added values. And they are YOURS, not your product's. Pay attention to what you are saying. Added value is what they care the most. If not, you already lost. They will just buy online. They are talking to you because they think there is a chance YOU (not your products) might add value. They just need to confirm it. You can break their expectations by passing the value over to the product and suffer the consequences of that, or confirm by getting it to yourself. It's all a slight tweak on your language and how do you present yourself.
    Last edited by vfpamp; 02-19-2020 at 02:32 PM.
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  13. #63
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    Amen to that !

  14. #64
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter lensmanmd's Avatar
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    Seems we all have our go-to's and our biases, eh? Here is a chart that I have been working on for my work group so that they can try to avoid biases, personal or professional.
    Yes, its true that there are some that are sensitive to CA. Most are not. It is not always the material. It could be a combination of material, base curve, fit and/or physiology. It could be surface aberrations or warpage. Not just one or the other.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by lensmanmd; 02-20-2020 at 11:31 AM. Reason: PNG did not populate
    I bend light. That is what I do.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by lensmanmd View Post
    Here is a chart that I have been working on for my work group so that they can try to avoid biases, personal or professional.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Biases are reinforced by the small set of suppliers opticians and labs tend to work with in a recurring basis.

    I like the simplicity of the table, but I am not sure how effective it is given the high variability of specs within multiple products of the same supplier.

    For instance, when phones are manufactured, each of them go through a sequence of tests to validate their assembly. But failing one of these tests doesn't mean that the phone is not working as designed. For instance, a few tests will indicate memory longevity. Phones that are A quality, have results that inform the memory will last at least 3 years. B, C, and D qualities will last less. One worse than the other. When you buy a phone at a promotion or a discounted price from the main manufacturer, you are getting the C and D phones. They are exactly the same brand and model, they will work as good a the A one, but will present issues sooner than the As and Bs.

    Obviously, no one tells the consumers which quality they are getting and most people don't even know there is an internal ranking system for phones. And virtually every electronic component.

    The same thing happens with lenses and frames. With in the same type, within the same supplier and the same product line, you can buy A quality or D quality. If you cry for discounts, they will give you the D (pun intended). And those variances are big enough to change the table you have. Maybe the lenses will chip sooner. Maybe the abbe values are not as good due to an extended dying process. Maybe mold was getting old and slightly warped.

    And that's yet another reason why opticians diverge so much in their statements here.

    This practice is so interesting that some companies only buy Cs and Ds and fix them individually to resell as A-like or B-like.
    Last edited by vfpamp; 02-20-2020 at 12:22 PM.
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  16. #66
    Eyes eastward... Uilleann's Avatar
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    The reality is simply this: The VAST majority of patients can't tell ANY difference WHATSOEVER between the optics of poly or Trivex, or even CR-39, when even remotely competently fit in appropriate prescription ranges. It's that simple. And the amount of CA induced in each material is not mathematically or optically significant to rise to a level that approaches human perception. The math doesn't lie.

    If you prefer Trivex for other reasons, and you're able to stay in business with the margins it provides you - great! You get a gold star. If someone else can do exactly what you're doing in the patient's eyes with poly, or CR, or 1.56, or the lid from a take-out food container - great! They're every bit as competent to the patient at the end of the dispense. The tired old Coke vs Pepsi, Ford vs Chevy, America vs anyone else tropes are beyond tired. Let's bury the endless misinformation in the past, where it belongs.


  17. #67
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    I look at it this way:
    1. Poly for everyone because of it's good features. Groovy, thinner, lighter, impacty, UV. A great base lens.
    2. High index for those who are bad. (That's really a small number.) 1.67 is not the pick, here, but it's super available so we go with it. The optics are no better or worse than poly.
    3. Low index for those who are optical snobs. (That's really a small number.) Trivex is here with CR39.

    Remember, all the bad stuff about poly is power dependent. If you use poly right, the disadvantages disappear.

    And don't forget, 1.5 CT poly with a FFSV is pretty dang cool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
    The reality is simply this: The VAST majority of patients can't tell ANY difference WHATSOEVER between the optics of poly or Trivex, or even CR-39, when even remotely competently fit in appropriate prescription ranges. It's that simple. And the amount of CA induced in each material is not mathematically or optically significant to rise to a level that approaches human perception. The math doesn't lie.
    While I agree with you, and not only with patients, sometimes I can't tell the difference between them myself, I also understand that people will not see the difference *until the appropriate environment highlights their difference*. Chromatic aberration only truly matters in broadband high contrast situations. Until the patient sees, and gets used to the benefits on a good lens and then goes back to a poorer one, he will not know the difference. But once he goes up, he will not like going back. And sometimes it takes weeks for them to notice that they went backwards in quality. By that time, most opticians already computed that patient as one of the "happy ones".
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  19. #69
    Eyes eastward... Uilleann's Avatar
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    Again, the scenario is impossible, with properly fit lenses. If you're fitting high Rxs in poly, then sure, you get everything you deserve when the patient's wrath comes down. But the reality is EVERY single lens material - including our old beloved glass - exhibits CA. If a pt is *that* picky, a discussion of CLs is in order. But to continue to beat the dead horse, as far as CA is concerned, when properly fit, in a reasonable SRx range, the amount of CA a given eye will experience in poly is literally below human perception. It's in the math. It's easy to show.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post
    I look at it this way:
    1. Poly for everyone because of it's good features. Groovy, thinner, lighter, impacty, UV. A great base lens.
    2. High index for those who are bad. (That's really a small number.) 1.67 is not the pick, here, but it's super available so we go with it. The optics are no better or worse than poly.
    3. Low index for those who are optical snobs. (That's really a small number.) Trivex is here with CR39.

    Remember, all the bad stuff about poly is power dependent. If you use poly right, the disadvantages disappear.

    And don't forget, 1.5 CT poly with a FFSV is pretty dang cool.
    +1.

    Know your material pros and cons. Fit the best frame for the RX. Minimize decentration. Add AR to deal with reflectivity. Know your materials.
    I bend light. That is what I do.

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