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Thread: Finding PAL Markings

  1. #1
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    Finding PAL Markings

    I wanted to find some simple tricks to finding the engravings on a PAL lens. I have been finding it difficult lately to find the engravings, especially thru the AR coating. I am familiar with how to look for them but they seem to be playing hide-n-seek today. I was hoping someone could suggest some new techniques for finding them.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phuztone View Post
    I wanted to find some simple tricks to finding the engravings on a PAL lens. I have been finding it difficult lately to find the engravings, especially thru the AR coating. I am familiar with how to look for them but they seem to be playing hide-n-seek today. I was hoping someone could suggest some new techniques for finding them.

    Thanks!
    Use a PAL indentifier. We have one www.superoptical.com small equipment, mention you are a optiboard member and get 20% off.
    Hint: On higher minus put a +4.00 over the top of the unit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Gilman View Post
    Use a PAL indentifier. We have one www.superoptical.com small equipment, mention you are a optiboard member and get 20% off.
    Hint: On higher minus put a +4.00 over the top of the unit.
    Thanks, Don. I checked this out & your price is a little better than others I have looked at, & with the 20% discount I may consider that.

  4. #4
    OptiWizard
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    Look for them with the lens near the edge of lights, windows, overhead lights, led. The edge between the light and dark usually make them stand out. Also you can ask your lab to calibrate their engraver if they are consistently difficult to find.

  5. #5
    My Brain Hurts jpways's Avatar
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    I use one of 3 methods
    1. The looking at the edge of a light, I'm about a -6 so taking off my glasses give me the magnification, in one part of our optical the fluorescent light cover is a grid pattern which makes it even easier
    2. PAL identifier, we actually have 2 in the office, 1 is Essilor's which is similar to Superoptical's (+4 lens over a green light) and 1-800-Optisource's 3 in one identifier (PAL identifier, polariscope, and finishing indentifier) which is a +4 lens over a white light. I don't know why, but I can't see anything when I'm using Essilor's, but I can generally find it easily using Optisource's
    3. Polariscope, especially with really scratched lenses I like the polariscope the best because of the additional contrast that the polarization provides. DIY hint, if you have a polarized lens and an LCD monitor, you have a polariscope, just hold the polarized lens between the glasses and the monitor and mark from the back.

  6. #6
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter lensmanmd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpways View Post
    I use one of 3 methods
    1. The looking at the edge of a light, I'm about a -6 so taking off my glasses give me the magnification, in one part of our optical the fluorescent light cover is a grid pattern which makes it even easier
    2. PAL identifier, we actually have 2 in the office, 1 is Essilor's which is similar to Superoptical's (+4 lens over a green light) and 1-800-Optisource's 3 in one identifier (PAL identifier, polariscope, and finishing indentifier) which is a +4 lens over a white light. I don't know why, but I can't see anything when I'm using Essilor's, but I can generally find it easily using Optisource's
    3. Polariscope, especially with really scratched lenses I like the polariscope the best because of the additional contrast that the polarization provides. DIY hint, if you have a polarized lens and an LCD monitor, you have a polariscope, just hold the polarized lens between the glasses and the monitor and mark from the back.
    +1
    Essilor for general purpose, Optisource for the hard to find ones. I use both.
    And, we calibrate our engraver quite often. Different materials take different intensities. We engrave prior to polishing so that the surface is smoother for the hardcoat, which makes our calibrations a bit more tedious. Many labs engrave after polishing. I would contact your lab to let them know that their engravings are too light.
    I bend light. That is what I do.

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