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Thread: AR sales

  1. #26
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bta89 View Post
    How well do lower quality AR's hold up to better ones. For example like a Crizal Easy UV compared to the Alize or Sapphire 360. I just feel like the lower end ones aren't as good quality and don't hold up as well. We don't really offer lower quality AR's
    We're hostage to EyeMed, and their "standard AR" (which is available to members for a ridiculously low price) is called "Sharpview" (and most here know about it).

    I would say about 50% of the time it looks horrible in one year. Ruins the glasses, IMO.

    I have implemented a policy of "no crappy AR" (but I would consider it for backside).

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post
    We're hostage to EyeMed, and their "standard AR" (which is available to members for a ridiculously low price) is called "Sharpview" (and most here know about it).

    I would say about 50% of the time it looks horrible in one year. Ruins the glasses, IMO.

    I have implemented a policy of "no crappy AR" (but I would consider it for backside).
    There are no 2 things I despise less than when I operated at a discount chain optical: (besides walk-ins and double bookings)
    -cheap AR
    -cheap progressives.
    Save a nickel on AR today...and it'll cost you later when that customer says they don't want it because it scratches so easily.
    Save a nickel on a progressive today...and I guess that's maybe a good way to boost multi-pair sales in the future.
    Or you could at least attempt to sell a product that works and not one that's the cheapest way to hating your job.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post

    I have implemented a policy of "no crappy AR" (but I would consider it for backside).
    I have the same policy. Good move. I only use high quality AR due to durability.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by pknsbeans View Post
    Save a nickel on AR today...and it'll cost you later when that customer says they don't want it because it scratches so easily.

    Or you could at least attempt to sell a product that works.
    +1 Yes.

  5. #30
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter lensmanmd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bta89 View Post
    How well do lower quality AR's hold up to better ones. For example like a Crizal Easy UV compared to the Alize or Sapphire 360. I just feel like the lower end ones aren't as good quality and don't hold up as well. We don't really offer lower quality AR's
    Like all good/better/best, there will be differences. Overall complaints depend on the patient more than the quality of the coatings.
    AR coatings will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, from lab to lab. Spin coat, dip coat, primer coat are the basic variants. The number of layers, hydro, oleo, anti-static also play a role.

    Just because it is spun coat does not meant that the AR is crap. Just because it is thermal cured does not mean that the AR is great. I see plenty of issue with Premium coatings and basic coatings. These issues can normally be directed to the dispensing optician and the habits of the wearer. Most coatings fail due to over-heating by being left in the vehicle, or by the optician heating the lenses during adjustments. Thermal expansion and contraction cannot be overcome, even with the best primer coats.

    Stock FSV ARs are not index matched, but they are thermal cured. Most are multilayered and come with basic hydro. HMC+, the new standard in SFSV AR is a multilayered product with decent hydro. These are better than many labs' basic coatings.

    Opticians need to stop with Crizal is best, Hoya is best, Duravision is best, if you want to increase your revenue.

    AR should be one of the first things that you think about when providing the best overall vision. Educating your patients is the second thing. Ok, you hear "I hate this coating, it smudges too easily" all of the time, yes? Well, do you know why? All lenses smudge. Uncoated lenses reflect so much light that the smudges are hidden. Plain and simple. AR reduces reflections, ergo, you see the smudges more. Educate your patients. Don't hold back on GBB based on your personal biases. Talk to your lab about their warranties.

    And yes, top tier coatings last longer overall due to the thermal curing and primer layers. They have better hydro and oleo properties. And they come with a premium price to your and your patients. But, a big but, all this still lies in the hands of the wearer. If the wearer knows how to take care of their lenses, even a basic AR will last. If they are careless, then even the best AR will scratch and craze. And, if the optician is too lazy to take the lenses out during adjustments, well, shame, shame, shame. Don't blame the coating.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by lensmanmd View Post
    Like all good/better/best, there will be differences. Overall complaints depend on the patient more than the quality of the coatings.
    AR coatings will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, from lab to lab. Spin coat, dip coat, primer coat are the basic variants. The number of layers, hydro, oleo, anti-static also play a role.

    Just because it is spun coat does not meant that the AR is crap. Just because it is thermal cured does not mean that the AR is great. I see plenty of issue with Premium coatings and basic coatings. These issues can normally be directed to the dispensing optician and the habits of the wearer. Most coatings fail due to over-heating by being left in the vehicle, or by the optician heating the lenses during adjustments. Thermal expansion and contraction cannot be overcome, even with the best primer coats.

    Stock FSV ARs are not index matched, but they are thermal cured. Most are multilayered and come with basic hydro. HMC+, the new standard in SFSV AR is a multilayered product with decent hydro. These are better than many labs' basic coatings.

    Opticians need to stop with Crizal is best, Hoya is best, Duravision is best, if you want to increase your revenue.

    AR should be one of the first things that you think about when providing the best overall vision. Educating your patients is the second thing. Ok, you hear "I hate this coating, it smudges too easily" all of the time, yes? Well, do you know why? All lenses smudge. Uncoated lenses reflect so much light that the smudges are hidden. Plain and simple. AR reduces reflections, ergo, you see the smudges more. Educate your patients. Don't hold back on GBB based on your personal biases. Talk to your lab about their warranties.

    And yes, top tier coatings last longer overall due to the thermal curing and primer layers. They have better hydro and oleo properties. And they come with a premium price to your and your patients. But, a big but, all this still lies in the hands of the wearer. If the wearer knows how to take care of their lenses, even a basic AR will last. If they are careless, then even the best AR will scratch and craze. And, if the optician is too lazy to take the lenses out during adjustments, well, shame, shame, shame. Don't blame the coating.
    Well stated. We have sold 10's of thousands of a very inexpensive SHMC and while we offer no warranty due to the very low cost we have virtually no complaints even in the Caribbean which is a tough sell for AR.

  7. #32
    Manuf. Lens Surface Treatments
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    Redhot Jumper top tier coatings last longer overall .............................................

    Quote Originally Posted by lensmanmd View Post

    And yes, top tier coatings last longer overall due to the thermal curing and primer layers. They have better hydro and oleo properties. And they come with a premium price to your and your patients. But, a big but, all this still lies in the hands of the wearer. If the wearer knows how to take care of their lenses, even a basic AR will last. If they are careless, then even the best AR will scratch and craze. And, if the optician is too lazy to take the lenses out during adjustments, well, shame, shame, shame. Don't blame the coating.

    very well done description, and down to the nitty gritty .................................................
    Chris Ryser
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    DLO. NA.IC.I.T.PO

    http://optochemicals.com............................. http://arcoatings.com

  8. #33
    Master OptiBoarder AngeHamm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lensmanmd View Post
    AR should be one of the first things that you think about when providing the best overall vision. Educating your patients is the second thing. Ok, you hear "I hate this coating, it smudges too easily" all of the time, yes? Well, do you know why? All lenses smudge. Uncoated lenses reflect so much light that the smudges are hidden. Plain and simple. AR reduces reflections, ergo, you see the smudges more. Educate your patients. Don't hold back on GBB based on your personal biases. Talk to your lab about their warranties.
    Educate. Your. Patients. Manage expectations. I tell everyone that they will need to clean their AR lenses more frequently because "Everything is clearer, including the dirt and dust on your lenses."
    I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AngeHamm View Post
    Educate. Your. Patients. Manage expectations. I tell everyone that they will need to clean their AR lenses more frequently because "Everything is clearer, including the dirt and dust on your lenses."
    +1. Yup!

  10. #35
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    Redhot Jumper A warranty is “a promise or guarantee given.” ....................................

    Quote Originally Posted by lensmanmd View Post

    Good, better, best should be a strategy in all of retail. Having an entry level AR will help promote AR sales. Basic ARs have come a long way. Having a higher tier AR will only promote additional revenue, as they come with longer warranties and better hydro/oleo/scratch resistance. No additional cost to the provider, nor consumer to replace damaged coatings.
    A warranty is “a promise or guarantee given.” A warranty is usually a written guarantee for a product, and it holds the maker of the product responsible to repair or replace a defective product or its parts. It is only used as a noun.

    What about the difference between warranty and guaranty ?
    Warranty Vs. Guarantee

    What’s the difference between warranty and guarantee?

    A warranty is “a promise or guarantee given.” A warranty is usually a written guarantee for a product, and it holds the maker of the product responsible to repair or replace a defective product or its parts. It is only used as a noun.

    So, what’s a guarantee? Basically, it’s the promise included in the formal (and legal) warranty.

    As a noun, guarantee is “an agreement assuming responsibility to perform, execute, or complete something and offering security for that agreement.” It is a promise or an assurance, especially one given in writing, that attests to the quality or durability of a product or service, or a pledge that something will be performed in a specified manner.

    As a verb, it can assure someone that you have confidence in your product or service. For example: “I guarantee that you’ll love this product or you’ll get your money back!”


    https://www.dictionary.com/e/warranty-or-guarantee
    Chris Ryser
    ________________________________________
    DLO. NA.IC.I.T.PO

    http://optochemicals.com............................. http://arcoatings.com

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