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Thread: Specsy 3D printed frames

  1. #1
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    Specsy 3D printed frames

    Has anyone seen or is anyone using? Your thoughts.

  2. #2
    Manuf. Lens Surface Treatments
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    Blue Jumper Overall, 3D-printed eyewear can be organized into two general groups.................

    TWO CATEGORIES

    Overall, 3D-printed eyewear can be organized into two general groups — ready-to-wear and customized. Ready-to-wear 3D-printed frames exhibit the features and benefits that come along with this manufacturing process. They are sustainably manufactured, lightweight yet durable, but they are sold off optical dispensary boards just like traditional frames.

    Customized 3D-printed frames take full advantage of the technology by being individually printed based on the unique measurements of the specific patient for whom they are being manufactured. After the patient’s measurements are determined by an optician using a tablet to take a 360-degree image of the patient’s head, they are then sent to the 3D printer to create a truly bespoke, one-of-a-kind frame that should fit with digitized precision.

    see all of it:
    https://www.visioncareproducts.com/a...ve-in-eyewear/
    Chris Ryser
    ________________________________________
    DLO. NA.IC.I.T.PO

    http://optochemicals.com............................. http://arcoatings.com

  3. #3
    Master OptiBoarder DanLiv's Avatar
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    I haven't seen this brand, but I have seen several 3D printed frames from other companies (Roger Bacon and Monoqool). All very similar, the material is durable and light enough, but looks and feels very cheap. I like the idea of 3D printing eyewear, but I despise the looks of the material so much that I can't get on board until it matures. Plus isn't 3D printing supposed to save money? Roger Bacon and Monoqool are expensive. Tom Davies custom handmakes premium acetate and titanium, to order, in London, for not much more than these 3D printed brands. The technology should either give me the same product I traditionally get now, but for half the price, or give me unlimited custom design flexibility for the same price I pay for traditional product now. It does neither. It will, but right now it's just a gimmick riding the 3D printing wave.

  4. #4
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanLiv View Post
    I haven't seen this brand, but I have seen several 3D printed frames from other companies (Roger Bacon and Monoqool). All very similar, the material is durable and light enough, but looks and feels very cheap. I like the idea of 3D printing eyewear, but I despise the looks of the material so much that I can't get on board until it matures. Plus isn't 3D printing supposed to save money? Roger Bacon and Monoqool are expensive. Tom Davies custom handmakes premium acetate and titanium, to order, in London, for not much more than these 3D printed brands. The technology should either give me the same product I traditionally get now, but for half the price, or give me unlimited custom design flexibility for the same price I pay for traditional product now. It does neither. It will, but right now it's just a gimmick riding the 3D printing wave.
    I am a new Specsy distributor.

    Specsy's frames are made out of nylon, so they don't look like those other frames. The raw material is white, and it's colored and tumbled for a few days. The end result has a pleasant matte finish. It isn't cheap, but considering it's a one-off frame, it isn't that expensive.

    I wouldn't think of 3D printing as a way to save money on eyeglasses. I think of it as a way to get a properly fitting frame for someone who's hard to fit or is having a difficult time finding something they like. The cost of mass-produced frames sourced out of the Far East will, I'm certain, be much less expensive per unit than the 3D printed frames.

  5. #5
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    Hay, thanks for the link, awesome.

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