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Thread: blue light what to use for a photographer

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    blue light what to use for a photographer

    Hi all we just had are lab come in and talk to us about blue light.
    What can you do to help a Photographer from blue light? What ever we use can not altar the color for them.
    Any pinput would br great.

    Thanks

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    Eyes eastward... Uilleann's Avatar
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    Find a new lab...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
    Find a new lab...
    What are you selling to help with blue light

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave E View Post
    What are you selling to help with blue light
    Dave E, search for threads on HEV you will find that we have hashed this out. Brian is probably feeling a bit blue right now but wait for it...
    I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it. Mark Twain

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    The more blue you get rid of the yellower the lenses are, it's that simple. If a task requires no departure from "normal" color perception, then you can't eliminate much blue except by moving farther away from the blue emitter and/or turning down the intensity for all wavelengths equally. The flux falls off by the square of the distance from the emitter to the eye.

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    Blue Jumper As simple as that, 100% blue eliminatiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Smith LDO View Post

    Dave E, search for threads on HEV you will find that we have hashed this out. Brian is probably feeling a bit blue right now but wait for it...
    As simple as that

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter SharonB's Avatar
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    Why not use a wratten filter for the camera? Or is it his eyes he is worried about?
    Lost and confused in an optical wonderland!

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    Redhot Jumper

    Quote Originally Posted by SharonB View Post

    Why not use a wratten filter for the camera? Or is it his eyes he is worried about?
    Good Idea, Sharon. However being a good optician I would assume that he or she could make their own instead of buying one.

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    No photographer worth their shutterspeed would wear a lens that blocked ANY specific wavelength of visible light. If you suggest such a thing to them you made a bad decision as an optician.

    The best lens for a photographer is probably CR39 or Trivex with Sapphire, then maybe other lenses with a blue reflex.
    Whatever AR you choose (and you should) make SURE it is a tough one because looking into camera again and again will scratchem up.

    EDITED: To sound like less of a jerk.
    Last edited by Tallboy; 11-19-2015 at 05:06 PM.

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    Master OptiBoarder AngeHamm's Avatar
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    If the patient is insistent on an HEV-addressing product, use TheraBlue. It does not distort visible frequencies appreciably.
    I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AngeHamm View Post
    If the patient is insistent on an HEV-addressing product, use TheraBlue. It does not distort visible frequencies appreciably.
    You are probably right. Also I have a client who likes rose tinted with AR for her daily wear, but when she is doing photograph she has cr39 Avance. Obviously most patients want one pair to do everything though....

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    Eyes eastward... Uilleann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tallboy View Post
    No photographer worth their shutterspeed would wear a lens that blocked ANY specific wavelength of visible light. If you suggest such a thing to them you made a bad decision as an optician.

    The best lens for a photographer is probably CR39 or Trivex with Sapphire, then maybe other lenses with a blue reflex.
    Whatever AR you choose (and you should) make SURE it is a tough one because looking into camera again and again will scratchem up.

    EDITED: To sound like less of a jerk.
    And here is the ONLY advice you need pay attention to.

    The fact is simply this: Professional (and many amateur/hobby) photographers want a strictly unaltered view of the world, and as clear and sharp an optic as possible on forward gaze. ANY blue blocking lens on the market today does not allow this. Period.

    In addition, I would hope they aren't using any of those sort of lenses if they are doing any proof work - particularly print related proofing, for the obvious reasons of altered color.

    Contacts an option perhaps?

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    Master OptiBoarder AngeHamm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
    Contacts an option perhaps?
    Contacts are a GREAT option here, if they can give proper correction to this patient! Color distortion or lack thereof aside, glasses are a really annoying barrier between the eye and the camera.
    I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AngeHamm View Post
    Contacts are a GREAT option here, if they can give proper correction to this patient! Color distortion or lack thereof aside, glasses are a really annoying barrier between the eye and the camera.
    Except most contacts have a light blue visibility tint that are non-optional. Some totally clear are available.

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    Blue Jumper That is why professional photographers use mostly grey filters.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post

    And here is the ONLY advice you need pay attention to.

    The fact is simply this: Professional (and many amateur/hobby) photographers want a strictly unaltered view of the world, and as clear and sharp an optic as possible on forward gaze. ANY blue blocking lens on the market today does not allow this. Period.

    In addition, I would hope they aren't using any of those sort of lenses if they are doing any proof work - particularly print related proofing, for the obvious reasons of altered color.


    That is why professional photographers use mostly grey filters.
    Here is one I know well.





    See the website: ======>
    http://www.progreyusa.com

    when on that website look at the Gallery for some of the best pictures you have ever seen.

    Last edited by Chris Ryser; 11-20-2015 at 03:02 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Ryser View Post
    That is why professional photographers use mostly grey filters.
    Here is one I know well.





    See the website: ======>
    http://www.progreyusa.com

    That is for the camera. I think that someone needs to come out with somthing for them they spend hrs outside and than hrs in front of a computer to edit that is a lot of blue light.

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    Correction - it's SOME amount of ALL light. And it is ALL important to correctly process photo images. DO NOT suggest removing blue frequencies from the photographers vision - regardless of whether behind the camera, or during proofing. Unless you want upset clients, and enjoy remakes.

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    I am just tring to think outside the box
    If they are using blue tec glasses when editing pictures everthing would have a little more yellow Wright . So they would correct changing the white balance witch would add more blue to the picture to bring it What looks good on there monotor. What if there was a way for the labs that printed the picture could compensate for that.

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    Eyes eastward... Uilleann's Avatar
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    Proofing screens can be (and often are) ridiculously expensive because of the high range of their color gamut. Why would anyone in their right mind spend thousands for one, and completely destroy the investment with yellow pee colored lenses?

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    Given that the "short" wavelength cone in human eyes can sense all the way down to 380 nm (including filtering by the cornea and the lens, with aphakia its possible to perceive shorter wavelengths, but that's obviously not a "normal" situation), although with practically no sensitivity below 400 nm, removing any amount of blue light will essentially create artificial tritanopia, and no photographer in the world would want that.

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    Master OptiBoarder AngeHamm's Avatar
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    The answer here, if your patient is desirous of an HEV-addressing lens, is multiple pairs: one with an HEV coating or treatment for most of the time, the other with a more neutral AR for photography.
    I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelarep View Post
    Given that the "short" wavelength cone in human eyes can sense all the way down to 380 nm (including filtering by the cornea and the lens, with aphakia its possible to perceive shorter wavelengths, but that's obviously not a "normal" situation), although with practically no sensitivity below 400 nm, removing any amount of blue light will essentially create artificial tritanopia, and no photographer in the world would want that.
    I think that's an exaggeration. I've looked through a lot of yellow filters and can still easily tell blue from other colors. I mean it does skew your perception a bit, but tritanopia? Hardly even tritanomaly. I think lots of photographers wouldn't mind protection from blue under casual avocation activities, but would probably forgo them for critical color intensive tasks. I don't think that even shooting photos requires accurate color control, as modern cameras take care of that except when they actually want to modify away from "normal" for some esthetic reason.

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    I am/was a pro photographer... I used to pick an AR with the LEAST amount of color change. I spent so much time on monitor calibration and print calibration. Super picky. I always did like above cr-39 or trivex and a zeiss teflon.

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    The least color change from an AR coating would be no AR coating at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Bill Stacy View Post
    I think that's an exaggeration. I've looked through a lot of yellow filters and can still easily tell blue from other colors. I mean it does skew your perception a bit, but tritanopia? Hardly even tritanomaly. I think lots of photographers wouldn't mind protection from blue under casual avocation activities, but would probably forgo them for critical color intensive tasks. I don't think that even shooting photos requires accurate color control, as modern cameras take care of that except when they actually want to modify away from "normal" for some esthetic reason.
    You're correct, its probably an exageration, but it depends on the level of blue blocking, I was going based on the plot provided above by Chris Ryser, blocking all the way to 525 nm would almost be the entire spectrum of the S cone, since it tops out at about 540 nm. The sensitivity between 525 nm and 540 nm of the S cone is extremely limited, so it would essentially be tritanopia.
    Last edited by Lelarep; 11-23-2015 at 03:16 PM.

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