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Thread: Enhanced Single Vision Lens?

  1. #1
    OptiBoard Professional OptiBoard Silver Supporter eryn's Avatar
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    Enhanced Single Vision Lens?

    I have a patient who brought in what I believe to be an enhanced single vision lens with the low add power (less than 1 diopter). The lens has an engraving that looks like a double T and under that a smiley face with the eyes closed like a hyphen. Does anyone know who makes this lens??
    ~ Erin
    ABOC

  2. #2
    Master OptiBoarder AngeHamm's Avatar
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    Sounds like the Essilor Anti-Fatigue lens.

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    OptiBoard Professional nicksims's Avatar
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    AngeHamm is correct. Anti-Fatigue.

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    OptiBoard Novice teej's Avatar
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    I work for Essilor and it is Anti- Fatigue. You should try Eyezen if that lens isn't working. Eyezen is a baby ADD lens for 1st time PAL users. 3 options of ADD power. I believe .75, 1, and 1.25.

  5. #5
    Compulsive Truthteller OptiBoard Gold Supporter Uncle Fester's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teej View Post
    I work for Essilor and it is Anti- Fatigue. You should try Eyezen if that lens isn't working. Eyezen is a baby ADD lens for 1st time PAL users. 3 options of ADD power. I believe .75, 1, and 1.25.
    I believe these add power are incorrect.

    Aren't the Eyezen like 0.00 .37 .62 and .87?

    Then it's "First Progressive" time?
    Last edited by Uncle Fester; 08-27-2019 at 10:28 AM. Reason: tweak...

  6. #6
    OptiBoard Novice teej's Avatar
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    Yea there is a SV version. And the ADD powere might actually be as you listed but i allways see them written in 1/4 diopter increments prbably for todays "dispensing optitions". Lol

  7. #7
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    I like Fester's post.

    Hey, they're not bad lenses at all.

    One could use them for a very early presbyope, but I don't. Let's think this out...what is the "drop" on these bad boys?


    And as to the choices, take my grandfatherly advice: use the zero (just FFSV) and the "#2" or "the deuce". There's no reason to worry about the rest.

  8. #8
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    The eyezen lenses are 0.4, 0.6, 0.85 and 1.1. Great lenses for emerging presbyopes.

  9. #9
    sub specie aeternitatis Pete Hanlin's Avatar
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    (Disclaimer- Essilor Employee)

    Gold Star for Julia- Eyezen+ is available in +0, +1, +2, +3, and- as of July- +4. As she indicated, their respective amounts of accommodative relief (plus power) are:
    +0 = +0.00D
    +1 = +0.40D
    +2 = +0.60D
    +3 = +0.85D
    +4 = +1.10D

    There are published age recommendations for each version, but of course the practitioner best knows what is appropriate for a specific patient. Each practitioner will also have a personal view on how each of these lenses should be used in practice. However, I'd like to make some observations from an ophthalmic standpoint (and from feedback I've had in numerous discussions with practitioners)…

    These are not intended to be used as progressive lenses. The only verifiable power is the patient's prescribed distance power. There is no identified "near zone" and there is no near power verification point. This is important because of the difference between "relieving" accommodation and "replacing" accommodation.

    It seems like a fine point, but the needs of a wearer capable of focusing on near objects are quite different from one who cannot. The focus-capable wearer is able to view near objects through any point in these lenses. The lower area of the lens may relieve accommodation, but the wearer is perfectly able to read through the upper portion as well. Therefore, there can be no definition of "reading zone" for this wearer- because the entire lens is the reading zone. Conversely, the focus-incapable wearer (presbyope) can only focus on near points with the aid of additional plus power. This creates a very definable "near zone" (the area through which near objects can be viewed).
    In my experience (and from practitioner feedback), Eyezen+ works great for the wearer who is capable of focusing at near through his/her distance correction. The vast majority of these wearers prefer Eyezen+ over their previous standard SV lenses. However, for a truly presbyopic patient (who cannot focus on near objects through his/her distance Rx), a PAL is a better solution- because a PAL is specifically designed to provide a comfortable area of near power for a wearer who cannot focus without it.
    I've experimented with a few wearers who "wanted to put off wearing a PAL" (seems that "+1.00 ADD" on their Rx translated to "you are now old and will soon die"). "I can still focus at near... most of the time" is the usual plea, so we try Eyezen+3 (+0.85D), and the reactions are usually pretty "meh." Then we try Varilux X Design- no comparison, near vision restored. Conversely, I've fit plenty of standard SV wearing coworkers with Eyezen+, and they're quite happy.

    Nevertheless, I know practitioners use Eyezen+ lenses for all sorts of innovative purposes (including as near variable focus lenses), so it helps to know how the lens is configured (e.g., drk's inquiry into the "drop").
    All Eyezen+ lenses are aspheric.
    The optical center and the fitting reference point (FRP) for Eyezen+0 is directly between the verification circles.
    For Eyezen+1, +2, +3, and +4, the optical center is between the verification circles, but the fitting reference point is located 4mm above (so the drop is 4mm). For those unfamiliar with "drop," it indicates how much pantoscopic tilt the designer intended for the lens (2 degrees of panto for each mm of drop, because this places the optical axis through the eye's center of rotation, or 8 degrees for this lens).
    For lenses that have plus power in the lower portion of the lens, this power will begin to appear 4mm below the fitting reference point (FRP). The power will then increase until approximately 11mm below the FRP. The full plus power listed for the design generally occurs below this point to the lower edge of the lens. This is very different from a PAL (depending on the manufacturer, plus power begins either right below, at, or even above the FRP in a PAL).
    You should always supply a fitting height for all Eyezen+ lenses (even +0, it is still an aspheric lens).
    All Eyezen+ lenses come with a built in blue light filter (Essential Blue).

    If you haven't tried Enhanced SV lenses with your patients, give your preferred manufacturer's offering in this category a try! SV lenses make up 50% of the market, so it's great to be able to provide a product that is differentiated from "standard."
    Pete Hanlin, ABOM
    Sr. Director Professional Solutions
    Essilor of America

    http://linkedin.com/in/pete-hanlin-72a3a74

  10. #10
    Master OptiBoarder AngeHamm's Avatar
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    Holy six-year-old thread, Batman!
    I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

  11. #11
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Holy nice post by Petey H!

  12. #12
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    Hi Pete,

    Can you explain the asphericity in eyezen? Is that by design or mechanical? If I clock the front surface of an Eyezen lens I get a consistent reading.

  13. #13
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    You can't clock an aspheric lens. The pins are too far apart to register the gradual change.

  14. #14
    sub specie aeternitatis Pete Hanlin's Avatar
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    You can usually use a lens clock to ascertain if a surface is aspheric (you just can't measure the true curve of the lens), because the reading on an aspheric surface will alter somewhat from center to edge. However, as drk notes, the pins are too far apart to provide an accurate reading regarding curvature, and you really have to measure carefully to see the variation in curvature across the lens in some cases.

    Regarding the asphericity on Eyezen+ lenses, you'll find it on the back surface of the lens. Eyezen+ is a digitally surfaced FBS formatted design. As with most FBS designs, the front surface of the blank is spherical and all the design elements are surfaced into the ocular surface of the lens. The entire design is aspheric- with a boost in power occurring along the lower portion of the lens (also called a "non-rotationally symmetrical aspheric design").
    Last edited by Pete Hanlin; 09-16-2019 at 08:13 PM.
    Pete Hanlin, ABOM
    Sr. Director Professional Solutions
    Essilor of America

    http://linkedin.com/in/pete-hanlin-72a3a74

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