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Thread: Inserting Lenses in Plastic Frame

  1. #1
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    Crier Inserting Lenses in Plastic Frame

    Hi! I am a newly licensed optician and have a problem I hope someone can help me with. What is the best way to insert lenses into a plastic frame? These are high plus lenses with base in prism. I only have a bead pan and no hot air blower. I could do this if I had the blower! I already destroyed one frame by leaving it in the glass beads for too long (the finish flaked and peeled). I am tempted to send every job to the lab and make them do it, but you know I don't have that choice when the patient is waiting right here for them to be done! I'd appreciate any tips out there! Thanks....:bbg:

  2. #2
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    Put frame in glass beads (Heat setting on beads should be as low as you can achieve pliability with. Move frame constantly, as soon as you detect any pilability in the frame, now is the time to insert lenses. Most folks put lenses in from the front, some from the back and some do either. Some base it on type of lens.

    First make sure that the lenses are not too big. Check circumference of demo's or old lens and new lens. Should be the same. If you don't have either and there is any shoulder beyond bevel on the back, it should fit in the frame snugly before the rim bevel is encountered.

    Also note some frames are cold mount only, frames fax will tell you which ones in the front of the book.

    Chip

  3. #3
    OptiBoard Professional Mike Fretto's Avatar
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    One trick I've seen is to add a small amount of baby powder to the bead pan it helps in keeping the beads from sticking and making those nice little indentations in the frame.
    Mike

  4. #4
    Optimentor Diane's Avatar
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    Mike Fretto said:
    One trick I've seen is to add a small amount of baby powder to the bead pan it helps in keeping the beads from sticking and making those nice little indentations in the frame.
    Mike,

    And here I thought I was the only one who did that. Makes them smell nice as well.

    Also, only heat the portion that actually needs to be heated at the time. Only one side at the time. Don't put extra pressure on the hinge area, and avoid heating that area if possible and hold the lens and frame closely in your fingers/hands, while inserting. Don't try to shove from a distance. Close control at all times.

    Diane (I love workshops)
    Anything worth doing is worth doing well.

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