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Thread: HEV question

  1. #1
    Independent Problem Optiholic edKENdance's Avatar
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    HEV question

    UV protection to 400nm seems to have been the standard for sun protection for a long time. More recently, maybe 12-13 years ago HEV protection became available in some sunglasses on the market but there hasn't been a new standard. HEV light, from my understanding is light in the 400-500ish wavelength range. A quick google search for sunglasses that protect against HEV light turns up some results that seem misleading. Here's an example from Oakley:

    Harmful blue light rays are known as High Energy Visible (HEV) wavelengths. HEV light has been linked to several forms of eye damage. That’s why our Plutonite® lens material is engineered to block 100% of all harmful blue light up to 400 nanometers. In addition to protection, this is a performance benefit because blue light rays are a major factor in glare

    If HEV light starts at 400nm then why are sunglass lenses that protect to 400nm claiming to block HEV light?


    I would probably answer this question like this: Because Money
    .

    Do you think these are misleading and potentially harmful claims?


    Last edited by edKENdance; 05-19-2012 at 01:06 PM. Reason: formatting

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter Barry Santini's Avatar
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    ANSI establish UV cut off at 380nm. Biologists say no human "sees" visual spectrum below 400nm.

    Confusion reigns.

    B

  3. #3
    Independent Problem Optiholic edKENdance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Santini View Post
    ANSI establish UV cut off at 380nm. Biologists say no human "sees" visual spectrum below 400nm.

    Confusion reigns.

    B
    Do you see a day when the ANSI will revisit the standards they've set based on the connection between MD and HEV light?

  4. #4
    ABOM Wes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Santini View Post
    ANSI establish UV cut off at 380nm. Biologists say no human "sees" visual spectrum below 400nm.

    Confusion reigns.

    B
    Barry, what you can't "see" can still damage tissue and kill you. UVC, X-Rays, Gamma rays...
    Wesley S. Scott, MBA, MIS, ABOM, NCLE-AC, LDO - SC & GA

    “As our circle of knowledge expands, so does the circumference of darkness surrounding it.” -Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Santini View Post
    ANSI establish UV cut off at 380nm. Biologists say no human "sees" visual spectrum below 400nm.

    Confusion reigns.

    B
    Personally, I'd question the biologists. The 400 nm is based on a "standard distribution" and there are quite possibly people who can see below 400 and above 750.

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    Great thread.

    Most literature would put the blue-light range from 400 to 500 nm and maybe more specifically, 400 to 470 nm. As the name suggests, High Energy Visible (HEV) light is above 400 nm. Below 400 nm is UV and not visible to the eye but is damaging to the cornea and lens. Most of the risk from HEV light has been linked to the retina.

    Studies from some of the research demonstrate increased retina cell damage in rats with HEV light. “Action Spectrum of Retinal Light-Damage in Albino Rats” Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 24:285-287, 1983.

    There is later research that actually shows how the particular wave-lengths of this light are long enough to not be absorbed by the outer tissues of the eye (thus making them visible) but still short enough to make them energetic enough to damage the retina (the shorter the wave-length the higher the energy). This damage is actually caused by absorption of this wave-length of light being absorbed by rhodopsin - a pigment in the photo-receptor cells of the retina. This then has been linked to age-related macular degeneration.

    At Vision-Ease Lens – we try to cut through the noise in our Coppertone Polarized Lens literature which does provide protection from HEV light. The key is blocking 100% UV up to 400 and filtering harmful (not blocking) HEV light beyond that. Completely blocking HEV…aka...blue light will result in the inability to recognize important visual information…ie…stoplights, etc.

    Vision-Ease Lens recently posted an in-depth white paper on HEV located on the Optiboard Home Page entitled: Implications of the Blue Light Hazard. We also posted info on how to download a consumer brochure written in conjunction with the Skin Cancer Foundation on Sunlight and Your Eyes. The brochure goes into the types of light, the damage it’s capable of (eye maladies) and how to protect against it.

    Thanks for the post!

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    I think the standard (God help me I'm defending ANSI) is set to prevent the glasses from cutting out any light that you can see. One could make an opaque lens that would cut out everything but what use would it be?

    Chip

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    so there is a lot of discussion right now about HEV light and filtering using different AR coatings and lenses with yellow filters such as Blue Tech lenses. I am still confused as to how much we are filtering and how much are we blocking and seriously does any of this really work or is just another way to make money? Opinions, proof, anything would be appreciated.

  9. #9
    Independent Problem Optiholic edKENdance's Avatar
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    Strange how it started as a discussion about suns and now we're here. I personally love the new advances with regards to blue light coatings. There's science to back it up, helps distinguish us as professionals who are concerned not only with vision but also long term eye health plus they're priced at the same level as my regular quality coatings so I can talk it up and let people know that it's included for the same price they'd usually pay but now they get additional benefits.

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