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Thread: Adjustment how-to help

  1. #1
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    Adjustment how-to help

    What's the best way to adjust the panto on a frame with two temples/side that each attach to the frame, one on top, one on the bottom. I'm struggling with my own frame, and to add to the difficulty, it's flat metal. We have stayed away from them in the past because the majority of our patients wear progressives and I can't imagine not being able to adjust for panto. Please help!!

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter rdcoach5's Avatar
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    The only way to panto a frame with thick endpieces is to bend both temples down with a padded pliar , one at atime by degrees until you get the proper tilt. I agree some of these frames with thick and pieces are not adjustable and we worn patients away from these that wear progressives. If you absolutely cannot panto the frame properly and the vertex distance is too great, DON"T sell the frame.

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    But what about the ones that have two temples per side? I'm not sure how else to describe it. They've got open sides, where the lenses are groove mounted. Thanks for the quick response!!!

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    Rochester Optical WFruit's Avatar
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    If it's the kind I'm thinking of, you will actually have to "roll" the eyewire (top and bottom) at the ends where the cord starts to induce panto. Hopefully you don't need too much panto or it will look funny.

    I don't suppose we can get a picture of the frame or a similar one?
    There are rules. Knowing those are easy. There are exceptions to the rules. Knowing those are easy. Knowing when to use them is slightly less easy. There are exceptions to the exceptions. Knowing those is a little more tricky, and know when to use those is even more so. Our industry is FULL of all of the above.

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter Barry Santini's Avatar
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    I fix these by bending the temple just ahead of the eartip...Makes them look a little scragly when they're off the head, but when worn, no one sees the bend.

    Works for me.

    B

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    Generally, on a split temple that you're describing, the split comes together about half way back toward the temple tip. I bend the temple down at that point, or just a little farther back from the joining. Even with a flat metal, you can get some bend and provide panto.

  7. #7
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    I also do what Barry does...works just fine

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    ok, so you are saying, adjust the part of the temple that comes together, to the front of where my ear is, up or down based on what I need to do? I see how that would work. thanks so much. I feel so smart now. :) Can't wait to share the info with the other's I work with.

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Gold Supporter Judy Canty's Avatar
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    In my little optical world, this adjustment requires angling pliers and a file, but I'm pretty old-school.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by optilady1 View Post
    But what about the ones that have two temples per side? I'm not sure how else to describe it. They've got open sides, where the lenses are groove mounted.
    Sounds like one of my own frames, a Magic Clip that I love. Thankfully I don't need much panto but I was careful who I sold it too since it was a bear to work with. I did the bend toward the back and it worked....kind of.

  11. #11
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    Years ago, when I was in college for opticianry, (yes, some of us actually earned degrees in this profession!) we were taught to file the temple at the hinges. If you needed panto, you would file more of the bottom edge of the temples, then bend the temple down at the hinge. Once you get good at it, if you file correctly, the temple will butt up to the front endpiece, and be parallel to it once the temple is bent and panto is achieved. Practice this on your stock of broken and discontinued frames before attempting this on a patient's pair. Back in the early 70's, temples were moderately wide, and we used this method quite often. Today, it's a lost "art".

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Gold Supporter Judy Canty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by icmor View Post
    Years ago, when I was in college for opticianry, (yes, some of us actually earned degrees in this profession!) we were taught to file the temple at the hinges. If you needed panto, you would file more of the bottom edge of the temples, then bend the temple down at the hinge. Once you get good at it, if you file correctly, the temple will butt up to the front endpiece, and be parallel to it once the temple is bent and panto is achieved. Practice this on your stock of broken and discontinued frames before attempting this on a patient's pair. Back in the early 70's, temples were moderately wide, and we used this method quite often. Today, it's a lost "art".
    +1

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    Quote Originally Posted by icmor View Post
    Years ago, when I was in college for opticianry, (yes, some of us actually earned degrees in this profession!) we were taught to file the temple at the hinges. If you needed panto, you would file more of the bottom edge of the temples, then bend the temple down at the hinge. Once you get good at it, if you file correctly, the temple will butt up to the front endpiece, and be parallel to it once the temple is bent and panto is achieved. Practice this on your stock of broken and discontinued frames before attempting this on a patient's pair. Back in the early 70's, temples were moderately wide, and we used this method quite often. Today, it's a lost "art".
    This is the way I was taught also, but it really doesn't work all that well for the type of frame described above IMHO. The older frames had the temple coming out right off the frame front, and any angle appeared normal useing the above technique. These newer POS type frames have L type end pieces that stick out from the front, almost at 90 degrees to the front, and any angle put at that point where the hinge is tends to look funny, unless it's just a couple degrees.
    JMHO

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by icmor View Post
    Years ago, when I was in college for opticianry, (yes, some of us actually earned degrees in this profession!) we were taught to file the temple at the hinges. If you needed panto, you would file more of the bottom edge of the temples, then bend the temple down at the hinge. Once you get good at it, if you file correctly, the temple will butt up to the front endpiece, and be parallel to it once the temple is bent and panto is achieved. Practice this on your stock of broken and discontinued frames before attempting this on a patient's pair. Back in the early 70's, temples were moderately wide, and we used this method quite often. Today, it's a lost "art".
    I learned this technique as well when I was in optical school too. The loverly fantastic ronsir frame. And the super thick plastic temple.

    And it wasn't too long ago (I graduated in 2002). But I agree that certain 'ancient' optician skills only surface when taught in college by the old school opticians.

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