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Thread: Shamir Spectrum vs Shamir Autograph

  1. #1
    Bad address email on file RetroRat's Avatar
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    Shamir Spectrum vs Shamir Autograph

    I notice both lenses are back surface free forms, but they differ in price so much, can anyone explain the difference? The most information I got from the sales rep was that the Autograph has a wider int corridor - without explaining why?

    Help much appreciated!

  2. #2
    Master OptiBoarder
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    Welcome to Optiboard RetroRat!

    Here in the States, I do not see a lens by the name of Shamir Spectrum. We do have the Shamir Element. The Element is positioned as a less expensive, less sophisticated *Free-Form* lens.

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    Bad address email on file RetroRat's Avatar
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    Hrm, I've not heard of the "Element lens" - but I'm in Australia, so potentially it's just a different name for the same thing. Could you talk to me through the differences between that and the Autograph lens? Might be a good place to start

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter Jubilee's Avatar
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    From my understanding, the original Autograph was their first foray into FreeForm design. Offering a backside progressive, aspheric surface, and accuracy to 1/100th of a diopter.

    The Auto II improved upon the design by incorporating position of wear measurements and "free frame" technology. So not only does it take into consideration the vertex distance, pantoscopic tilt and face from.. but also will take into consideration the frame dimensions to adjust the corridor to fit even the smallest of frames. This lens is available in a variable corridor length lens, and a fixed length.

    The Element is less sophisticated. It uses a backside progressive, but does not incorporate personalized optics. The fitting height is 16 mm compared to the 13 mm for Auto I and 11mm for Auto II.
    Last edited by Jubilee; 03-10-2010 at 07:05 AM.
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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter
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    Also, subjectively, I fine the Autograph II variable to be a vastly better lens than the Element, especially with respect to the intermediate corridor width and unwanted distortion intruding into my visual perception.
    John Henahan
    Spectrum Eyecare
    www.speceye.com

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    Rochester Optical WFruit's Avatar
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    The spectrum is still considered "under developement" here in the US. However, for some reason Shamir forgot to hide it (and several other new designs :) )in our prescriptor.

    The Element is very, very similar to the original Autograph designs (I actually think that they are the same, but I can't get anyone at Shamir to admit to it).

    The Autograph II designs have their As-Worn and Free Frame customizations that the Element doesn't have.
    There are rules. Knowing those are easy. There are exceptions to the rules. Knowing those are easy. Knowing when to use them is slightly less easy. There are exceptions to the exceptions. Knowing those is a little more tricky, and know when to use those is even more so. Our industry is FULL of all of the above.

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    Bad address email on file RetroRat's Avatar
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    So the Element and the Spectrum lenses are not the same? I've ordered one poly lens with the Autograph (office) lenses and another with the Spectrum just in the 1.5 so I'll post back in 7-10 working days with a bit of a comparison for anyone interested!

    (the poly is being multicoated for the higher index / low abbe value combo, watch this space!)

    Edit: That's one pair in one frame, and one pair in another, not two in teh same frame :P!

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    The Auto 2 is a WONDERFUL lens! I have dispensed approx. 40 or so of these since we started offering them in Nov. 2009. I have only had 1 non adapt! We ask the px for feedback on the lens about a week after dispense...and its all good!

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter Barry Santini's Avatar
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    I've been told at a Shamir CE this weekend that Spectrum is a non-POW compensated progressive design that is positioned between Auto II and Element, and is overall a softer design (more friendly in higher adds?) than Element

    Auto II SV is supposedly being renamed Spectrum SV, and may feature POW input.

    Barry

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    OptiWizard Mr. Finney's Avatar
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    I almost hate to say it, but I recently dispensed a pair of Auto 2's to a lady with one prosthetic eye. She was wearing Physio 360, and she claims the periphery of the 360 is much better than the Auto 2. Only .25 more cyl and .25 more add, similar BC. She was complaining about a lack of clarity and area at near, so I thought I would try a Fixed 11, but it seems to have really compromised her distance and intermediate too much.
    Bryan Finley, Florida Board Certified Licensed Dispensing Optician

  11. #11
    Bad address email on file RetroRat's Avatar
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    Well it's been about three months, plenty of time for a through exposition into these lenses (Okay, I forgot this thread was here)

    The Autograph lens is a super soft progressive, and I found at times I was feeling a little bit robbed of my reading corridor (even though the lens verted a full addition), but crisper distance than I've found in any other shamir products.

    The Spectrum lens (Be it Element or whatever) was a little less forgiving with peripheral distortions, but I had no complaints at all about reading (same script, different conclusion - I think my eyes are broke'd :hammer:)

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    The Spectrum is yet to be introduced in the US. Shamir expects it out later this summer. When it is released, Shamir will have a "good, better, best" option within their freeform lenses. All are 100% backside. The "good" lens is Element, "better" is Spectrum, and "best" is AutographII. Autograph II has the most features. It allows you to specify vertex distance, panto and wrap so the Rx is customized for how the frame is worn. It gives you the option of 4 different fixed designs (so you can determine the height of intermediate and reading) and a variable design. It is also available in a standard design, office design, wrap/sports design and single vision. The Spectrum will be offered in 3 fixed designs (no variable). It will not compensate for the as-worn or frame fit (vertex, wrap and panto). It will be available in a progressive and single vision, and has a wider corridor when compared to the Element. The Element is progressive only. It has 2 fixed designs, and does not qualify for the Shamir rewards program. This info all came off of a Spectrum Product Info sheet.

  13. #13
    Bad address email on file RetroRat's Avatar
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    The spectrum comes in a 14/16/18 fitting hight while the autograph lens (not the autograph II, we don't actually sell it at our practice ) comes in a 13/16/19 fitting hight

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    Master OptiBoarder TLG's Avatar
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    mmcgorrin,
    You must be the ultimate OB 'lurker'. Joined in 2001 and making your first post 9 years later?
    Welcome to Optiboard! Thanks for your input.

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    OptiBoard Apprentice csiopticians's Avatar
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    I am new to using Shamir Lenses. How do you determine whether you use the variable or the fixed design?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MelissaL View Post
    I am new to using Shamir Lenses. How do you determine whether you use the variable or the fixed design?
    The primary purpose of the variable lenses (regardless of brand) is to improve declination angles in higher adds with short corridors. Generally the higher the add the longer the corridor you want because with each increase in add you "squish" the usable intermediate space. If you break that rule, say use a 15 seg with a 2.50 Add, the Variable corridor lenses are your friend. Its a help though, not a cure. So any patient you fit in a variable should also have a second pair if they do computer work.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharpstick777 View Post
    The primary purpose of the variable lenses (regardless of brand) is to improve declination angles in higher adds with short corridors. Generally the higher the add the longer the corridor you want because with each increase in add you "squish" the usable intermediate space. If you break that rule, say use a 15 seg with a 2.50 Add, the Variable corridor lenses are your friend. Its a help though, not a cure. So any patient you fit in a variable should also have a second pair if they do computer work.
    Thank you so much. You explained it with complete clarity. I appreciate your help!

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