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Thread: No high index polarized lenses available?

  1. #1
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    No high index polarized lenses available?

    Hi!

    I'm looking for a high index polarized lenses (1.6-1.7, all normal lens coatings, colour brown).

    I'd like to get transmission down to about 15%, to be used for paddling, skiing (and driving).

    My local optician told me that he could not find any lenses which would meet my criteria. As a result, he recommended standard 1.5 lenses. His recommendation was based on the following arguments:

    - meaningless weight savings (2.5gr or 0.9oz for 2 lenses)
    - frames can easily accommodate thicker lenses (no visual implications).

    I am -2.5/-2.75. These are my frames:

    http://www.rodenstock.com/rod_web/co...0/40/16509.xml

    2 questions:

    1. Is he right that there are no high index polarized lenses?

    2. Is he right that high index polarized lenses would not be a sensible choice (even if they existed) because of modest weight savings and lack of any visual improvements?

    Thks a lot for any comments.

    Jacques

  2. #2
    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    Many companies offer polarized lenses in polycarbonate. Oakley and Maui Jim's rx sunglasses use poly for the most part. "True" hi-index lenses are few a far between. They might be a couple that offer 1.6 (Nikon is introducing one shortly in Canada) and I am not aware of any in 1.67. In any case I don't think a polarized 1.6/1.67 would ever be as thin as their clear counterparts. Many 1.6/1.67 have a centre thickness of 1.0, which would be difficult to achieve with a polarized wafer in the lens, I would imagine C.T.'s would be closer to 2.0mm.
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


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    Bad address email on file QDO1's Avatar
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    look at

    KB Co. 1.67 Ultra High Index Polarized Lens made by: www.kbco.net

    the thinner lens would be lighter, but the judgment on price Vs. weight is yours.. ask the optician to calculate the weights and thicknesses for you

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    Master OptiBoarder rinselberg's Avatar
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    Optima has SV lenses in polarized 1.67 high index: The product is called Optima PolarTec 1.67:

    http://www.optima-hyper.com/fpress.htm

  5. #5
    Underemployed Genius Jacqui's Avatar
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    Specialty Lens Corp. has 1.60 Polaroids, they would be thinner than 1.50 and cheaper than 1.67

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    Hoya 1.60

    Hoya has a 1.60 polarized available in Europe.

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    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QDO1
    look at

    KB Co. 1.67 Ultra High Index Polarized Lens made by: www.kbco.net

    the thinner lens would be lighter, but the judgment on price Vs. weight is yours.. ask the optician to calculate the weights and thicknesses for you
    I must be living in the past. :D
    Does anyone have a # for a Canadian supplier of KB co. lenses.
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


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    Sawptician PAkev's Avatar
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    I would first find a new optician as their lack of product knowledge may be a good indication they may also be lacking in other abilities. In order to maintain a license or certification, many of us take courses and attend seminars which bring us up to speed about the latest and most appropriate lensproducts available to meet our patients needs.

    A polarized lens will inherently be thicker and heavier than a conventional lens of the same index because it has to be ground to a thickness (thicker) that doesn't compromise the polarized filter which is sandwiched between the lens surfaces. Therefore, a high index material is indeed appropriate for someone that wants to recognize thinner and lighter lenses.

    Previous posters have indicated manufacturers that supply a high index polarized product to the industry. A value oriented retailer will probably be less likely to advocate the need for performance options such as high index since it is something they may not be able to aquire from their bargain basement wholesaler which will cut into their profit margin.

  9. #9
    Keep on truckin... Cherry Optical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacques
    Hi!

    I am -2.5/-2.75. These are my frames:


    2. Is he right that high index polarized lenses would not be a sensible choice (even if they existed) because of modest weight savings and lack of any visual improvements?

    Thks a lot for any comments.

    Jacques
    Jacques,

    My opinion would be similar to his. For that kind of Rx, a High Index 1.60-1.67 POL lens would probably be useless, especially for sunglasses. I would however suggest spending the money you apparently have budgeted and purchase an option such as a mirror coating (flash gold) with backside AR. The newest mirror coatings offer the oleophbic and hydrophobic properties of leading AR coatings along with a fashionable 'bling'.

    Another option to consider would be a melanin colored POL lens. I have always liked brown POL untill I wore melanin... Melanin seems to be easier on my eyes.

    Adam

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    As a result of the responses (see above), I identified the following high index polarized lenses (from Hoya):

    http://www.hoya.co.uk/index.php?SID=...5&page_id=3056

    My local optician was initially reluctant to see change the standard polarised lenses (Zeiss) to the new Hoya lenses. Many excuses:

    - modest weight savings
    - no visual improvements
    - more expensive (212 euros rather than 172 euros per lense)
    - too late, he had already ordered the Zeiss lenses

    I suspect that he was making more money with the Zeiss lenses (altough they were cheaper).

    Finally he agreed (but reluctantly) to change the lenses from Zeiss to Hoya but wanted to charge "a cancellation fee" of 30 euros (so European). However, the fee was subsequently "waived" to maintain the customer relationship.

    I am now paying 129 euros for the frames and 414 euros for lenses, -10% discount.

    Thks for all comments.

  11. #11
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    I would reccomend a melanin lens which i can get fitted into an existing frame you currently prefer Which can be polarized as well along with the natural polarizing effects of the melanin itself. These are also available with with Rx, computer/reading, and night driving.

    Brand, EPFValue, % Transmission
    Melanin, 40 ,19
    Ray Ban G-15, 9, 16
    Nupolar, 7 ,17
    Transitions (gray), 3, 44





    Last edited by Gid; 12-30-2005 at 12:09 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacques
    Hi!


    - meaningless weight savings (2.5gr or 0.9oz for 2 lenses)
    - frames can easily accommodate thicker lenses (no visual implications).

    I am -2.5/-2.75. These are my frames:

    http://www.rodenstock.com/rod_web/co...0/40/16509.xml
    I agree with your optician. Even if they are available, it's silly to degrade your optics for a tiny bit thinner lens that won't even be noticed in that frame. Go standard CR39 polar in those bad boys.

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