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Thread: Do you recommend AR to children?

  1. #1
    Optician Extraordinaire
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    Do you recommend AR to children?

    I never do till they are teenagers. I used to not recommend it because AR was hard to keep clean and scratched easily.

    Now with the better ARs they are very scratch resistant and are easier to clean so I am wondering if it is something I should start talking about for kid's eyewear. I hesitant because most kids are terrrible about cleaning their glasses and AR lenses do have to be cleaned often.

    I notice that Walmart sells it to kids now. The few I have seen usually look terrible.

    What do you do and why?

  2. #2
    Bad address email on file finklstiltskin's Avatar
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    I never recommend AR to kids due to scratching issues. Although kids need the UV protection that AR can provide, I tend to put them in poly, so that is a moot point.

    Fink

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    Under a certain age (10 or so) I wouldn't use AR. Too messy, costly, etc. Besides, what good are bent or broken glasses with AR?

  4. #4
    One of the worst people here
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    Since when is a coating like Crizal or SHV less scratch resistant than dip coated poly?

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    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    I say offer it and let the parents decide.
    With the high percentage of kids using computer today, not to mention fluorescent lighting in most schools, most learning is done with the eyes, why not offer more comfortable vision. There are also a number of really affordable lenses with AR on them, so price isn't as much of a factor. It's also a great way for parents to teach their children about responsibilty and taking care of something.

    Here is a question for those that wouldn't offer AR to children. What do your kids wear and why?
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


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    I am amazed. You precribe lenses that are to improve the quality of life for children, you tell them you are helping them see. How really then do you help them see when they complain of the reflection of there eye on their lenses, or the white reflections. Aside from the amazing wty's you are able to get know a days with Ar you are actually providing them what they come into your office for, better vision, not glared up lenses that scratch and cant be replaced under any wtys 6 months later, you are providing clear crisp vision and are able to back up a parents investment. And sorry for those people who stereo type parents and assume they wouldnt want to invest in their childs vision and visual comfort. I know my office cant be the only one using Ar for minors. Seriously are you all to assume what parents or minor pts want and need. Surely you are pt. educaters not eyeglass dictators. Our office has been extremely successful and I will say that we have happy return pts and our largest new pt base is from referrals, not any other form of advertising. People should get a choice what they want or not?

    Sorry for the pms type rant.
    Cindy

  7. #7
    threadkiller? eromitlab's Avatar
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    heck no! not until they are responsible enough to know how to look after their glasses, which it seems to be for some... never. Why have the parents waste the extra money on something that will impair their vision as the coat deteriorates months later??? No matter how responsible the parents are, the kids will do with their glasses what they will do... and that usually means damaged lenses in little or no time.

    I wore poly lenses for years as a teenager with no AR and I could see just fine... my parents saw no need for the extra cost of the non-glare coatings because I was hell on eyeglasses what with the rigors of youth and all. The glare argument is a weak one at best for kids, because they simply don't care as long as they can see the blackboard, read their spelling book and see the TV (they almost remind me of senior citizens sometimes). The glare in the lenses is not preventing clear vision, it's just not as sharp compared to an AR lens, but 9.99 out of 10 kids don't give a care anyhow.

    While I believe AR is possibly the best thing you can do for a lens, the fact remains there is no AR on the market right now that can stand up to the abuse an average eight-year-old can dish out... and why make parents pay for something that requires extra care and maintenance?? Isn't raising a child hard enough already?

  8. #8
    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eromitlab
    and why make parents pay for something that requires extra care and maintenance?? Isn't raising a child hard enough already?
    I not trying to pick on you, but parents buy their kids cell phones, ipods, dvd's, video games, $200 jeans with Swarowski crystals. Most of those require a little bit of care. Why not offer something that is worthwhile.
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


  9. #9
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    I am confused. Since when does AR need extra care. AR lenses turn out to be in better condition two years later than regular SRC coated lenses.

  10. #10
    threadkiller? eromitlab's Avatar
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    I know you're not picking on me... :shiner: but, it's not worthwhile when the coating is destroyed in under six months. I know this might be a bad analogy, but, it's just like the rationale that some of the docs I work with use when prescribing contacts for kids... if they can prove to be responsible enough to keep them clean and follow directions for care of them without deviation, it's not a bad thing... however, if they can't take care of something as simple as keeping the things clean, then no dice. I'm not likening AR to contact lenses, but the principle is that if the kid won't bother to take care of the investment, then the optician shouldn't bother to upsell.

  11. #11
    threadkiller? eromitlab's Avatar
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    For-Life:

    you should see some of the lenses I get to remake because of the replacement warranties we give on AR lenses. They'd make you cringe. I don't know why the sales staff bothers with AR half the time... oh, yeah... commissions. :(

  12. #12
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    What AR are you using?

  13. #13
    threadkiller? eromitlab's Avatar
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    I haven't the faintest other than it's a Zeiss-branded coating... at least that's what one of my former territory directors told me. I have lenses that are almost four years old and they still look like the day I pulled them out of the envelope, but some of the lenses I see are only months old and look like they've been on the business end of a power sander.

  14. #14
    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    I feel the AR is a worthwhile investment visually. Whether the child ruins the lenses or not is between the parent and their children. I've had parents as clients who will replace lenses every six month scratched or not, if the RX changes. Parents are willing to pay for something that improves their childs life or a portion of it. I don't understand why our industry as a whole, raves about this progressive, that material or another coating, and then when it comes to kids (Our future consumers) we aim for the bottom of the barrel because it is cheaper and they are going to scratch anyways. Same thing goes with kids frames, "they are going to break anyways so lets sell them crap that looks boring". No wonder many kids hate glasses, non AR lenses, regular plastic lenses in a generic frame. Whee!!:D
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


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    Quote Originally Posted by eromitlab
    For-Life:

    you should see some of the lenses I get to remake because of the replacement warranties we give on AR lenses. They'd make you cringe. I don't know why the sales staff bothers with AR half the time... oh, yeah... commissions. :(


    I dont make comission.
    So if a ragety looking cunstruction worker comes in do you assume that he would need an Ar or perhaps good sunglasses? Do you assume that he doenst deserve respect and the courtesy of an education as to what is available? You baffle me.

  16. #16
    threadkiller? eromitlab's Avatar
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    you're baffling yourself. and you assume too much. and maybe you don't know that someone that can't keep up on the lens shouldn't be using it for general activites or working. my store averages AR on just about every other pair we sell... and we sell a lot of cleaning supplies with the whole dog and pony show on how to clean the lenses properly... and some these same people come back months later with destroyed coatings. it has nothing to do with who, but what is being done to them.

    my point is that not everyone needs or should have AR... especially people that are going to subject their glasses to abuse. it's obvious to me that you think we don't ask lifestyle questions... or sell a knockabout pair for work/play and a "good" pair with AR for non-active use.

    honestly, you baffle me...

  17. #17
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Silver Supporter Jubilee's Avatar
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    IT just goes to show that adults aren't any better than kids.. but if they want to spend the money on a worthwhile coating, we should provide it.

    I have several children who wear A/R in this practice. Some suffer from coloboma and other conditions where we want as much light to enter the eye as possible. The second consideration is the amount of computer time our children are having. My son is in second grade, and last year he spent an average of an hour a day on the computer just in school, and this year is looking the same. Even more monitor time is given is you look at the big screens, and computer projected screens/white boards, etc that they use in school. This doesn't even take into consideration time at home spent on computers (for fun or for education) and video games.

    With some of the newer A/Rs they get a better scratch warranty than what they would get with a regular SRC anyway. And many insurance plans either cover the cost, or a portion there of.

    So let the parents decide if they want it for their child.

    Cassandra
    "Some believe in destiny, and some believe in fate. But I believe that happiness is something we create."-Something More by Sugarland

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Gold Supporter Judy Canty's Avatar
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    I recommend it every day.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedi
    I not trying to pick on you, but parents buy their kids cell phones, ipods, dvd's, video games, $200 jeans with Swarowski crystals. Most of those require a little bit of care. Why not offer something that is worthwhile.
    This sounds like a much older kid. If we're talking about 13-17 year olds, then yes, AR is fine. But I don't know any 8 year olds that have $200 jeans.

  20. #20
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Gold Supporter Judy Canty's Avatar
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    And I know a 9-year old with a wardrobe of Eye Woods to compliment her various outfits. You just never know...so why not offer?

  21. #21
    Master OptiBoarder Darryl Meister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedi
    I don't understand why our industry as a whole, raves about this progressive, that material or another coating, and then when it comes to kids (Our future consumers) we aim for the bottom of the barrel because it is cheaper and they are going to scratch anyways.
    Well said.
    Darryl J. Meister, ABOM

  22. #22
    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darryl Meister
    Well said.
    Thanks Darryl. Though I don't have kids of my own and I don't dispense very often to children, (I work in a downtown office) this sort of topic hits home. I have a 10 year old niece who started wearing glasses a couple of years ago. He mom was in a rush to get them so they got them at their OD's office. Regular plastic/ no AR in a +4.00. It broke my heart we she told me she would get picked at school because her eyes looked funny. My wife and I bought her latest pair (she should get them today in the mail), she told my mother in law she was so happy that she was getting new glasses from Uncle Jarratt because her eyes wouldn't look so big. You can't put a price on that.
    Last edited by Jedi; 11-30-2005 at 05:43 PM.
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


  23. #23
    Master OptiBoarder Darryl Meister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedi
    You can't put a price on that
    Sure you can. ;) For only a few extra dollars -- the price of better lenses and frame -- you significantly improved that child's quality of life. It was a heck of a return on your investment, I suspect.
    Darryl J. Meister, ABOM

  24. #24
    Bad address email on file finklstiltskin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedi
    Thanks Darryl. Though I don't have kids of my own and I don't dispense very often to children, (I work in a downtown office) this sort of topic hits home. I have a 10 year old niece who started wearing glasses a couple of years ago. He mom was in a rush to get them so they got them at their OD's office. Regular plastic/ no AR in a +4.00. It broke my heart we she told me she would get picked at school because her eyes looked funny. My wife and I bought he latest pair (she should get them today in the mail), she told my mother in law she was so happy that she was getting new glasses from Uncle Jarratt because her eyes wouldn't look so big. You can't put a price on that.
    Ya know...AR wouldn't make her eyes look any smaller...but you knew that already.

    Fink

  25. #25
    Master OptiBoarder Darryl Meister's Avatar
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    I'm sure Jarratt hooked her up with some high-index aspheric lenses, as well.
    Darryl J. Meister, ABOM

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