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Thread: Good Men's Sunglasses?

  1. #1
    OptiBoard Professional Ryan's Avatar
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    Good Men's Sunglasses?

    I found several lines for women's sunwear to add to my dispensary, now I am looking for some good quality, resonable priced sunwear for men. I don't want Ray Ban,(lux product) and I don't want the high priced Hugo Boss either. I am looking for something able to be RXed and just a good value. Any help would be appreciated.

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    One of the worst people here
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan
    I found several lines for women's sunwear to add to my dispensary, now I am looking for some good quality, resonable priced sunwear for men. I don't want Ray Ban,(lux product) and I don't want the high priced Hugo Boss either. I am looking for something able to be RXed and just a good value. Any help would be appreciated.
    Check out Viva. That got some great Gant stuff.

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    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    Safilo's Polo sport is a decent sunglass for the $$$ and in non-RX the polarized lens are the same price as the tint/uv choices.
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


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    Is it November yet? Jana Lewis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan
    I found several lines for women's sunwear to add to my dispensary, now I am looking for some good quality, resonable priced sunwear for men. I don't want Ray Ban,(lux product) and I don't want the high priced Hugo Boss either. I am looking for something able to be RXed and just a good value. Any help would be appreciated.
    Ryan-

    Fossil makes some good looking mens sunglasses. I have several in my dispense and they seem to fly off the shelves.

    I think it's worth looking in to.

    Good Luck!
    Jana Lewis
    ABOC , NCLE

    A fine quotation is a diamond on the finger of a man of wit, and a pebble in the hand of a fool.
    Joseph Roux

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    Sawptician PAkev's Avatar
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    Not sure if they are still around but a company called I-Beams had nice mens ophthalmic sunwear. Stylish frames with double spring hinges made their sunwear almost indestructable. I saw them at Expo a few years ago but haven't seen anything about them recently.

    We use Costa Del Mar sunwear products quite a bit. They have many styles, are well built to meet the demands of sunwear use, have a lifetime frame warranty, and also have positive brand recognition among performance sunwear users.


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    Master OptiBoarder
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    RAY BAN, SPY far more than any other brands I carry! Buy some Luxottica stock and get over it!

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    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Ray Ban is the definitive answer for men's sunwear. Basic stuff, good to Rx since lenses are glass without the frills. Good price. Great selection, style, quality. Also, is deep enough to have a performance lens selection as well, often in the same styles. I love Ray Ban.

    Having said that, I have discontinued Ray Ban, due to the international boycott to save private opticianry and optometry. Sad casualty of the war. It's killing me.

    Ditto Jana and Jedi's recommendations. Actually, Carrerra is good, too. Made in China, though, but good styles. Polo Sport is our future men's fashion sunwear, I think.

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    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    In case anyone cares: saw Polo Sport sunwear rep today. Not bad at all. China, though. It'll do nicely.

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    OptiBoard Professional Ryan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info!! Has anyone tried the Poloroid frames from E'lite? Just got some info on it, not sure though. Thanks again!

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    Quote Originally Posted by For-Life

    Check out Viva. That got some great Gant stuff.
    For Life...........If he dont want Lux he for dont want Viva either...........remember they now belong to that insurance.

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    Manuf. Lens Surface Treatments
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    Quote Originally Posted by drk

    In case anyone cares: saw Polo Sport sunwear rep today. Not bad at all. China, though. It'll do nicely.
    drk.........your ok.............but they are alll out of China.........makes no difference

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Ryser
    drk.........your ok.............but they are alll out of China.........makes no difference
    Good point there - China is producing great stuff.

    As for Viva, I am still tearing my head around that one working on some inner conflict with myself.

  13. #13
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Ryser
    drk.........your ok.............but they are alll out of China.........makes no difference
    Chris, I know you always say that. Would you check out this link and offer your opinion after reading it? I'm interested in whether you think these guys are flat-out lying, or what.

    http://www.eyecarebiz.com/article.aspx?article=&loc=archive\2003\september\0903fbframe .htm
    I do notice a difference in feel between a lesser-quality frame and a higher-quality frame. I'm naiive enough to think there is a difference...
    Last edited by drk; 02-03-2005 at 07:35 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by drk
    Chris, I know you always say that. Would you check out this link and offer your opinion after reading it? I'm interested in whether you think these guys are flat-out lying, or what.
    http://www.eyecarebiz.com/article.aspx?article=&loc=archive\2003\september\0903fbframe .htm

    I do notice a difference in feel between a lesser-quality frame and a higher-quality frame. I'm naiive enough to think there is a difference...
    Link does not work for me.

    I have noticed that a lot of frames made in Italy 3 or 4 years ago are now made in China, but that is the way the world market is going. I also do not notice any fall in quality because of it. It is not that they are using cheaper materials or equipment, but cheaper labour.

  15. #15
    Bad address email on file Mikef's Avatar
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    Before you buy any new lines you might want to go to TjMaxx or Marshalls. They have a lot of good stuff cheep. Most from many of the big venders but not all of them!

  16. #16
    What's up? drk's Avatar
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    Sorry, can't get it to work. Cut and paste:








    FRAME Shame
    A timely look at the country of origin debate and its impact on the industry
    By Marcy Bruch


    Made in Italy. Made in France. Made in Japan. Made in China. Whether it's looking inside a shirt collar or a frame temple, what kind of picture does the country of origin marking paint for you? For many, the thought of anything made in Italy conjures images of leathergoods soft as butter and finely stitched apparel that hugs the body like a glove. The thought of product made in France brings to mind models catwalking on Paris runways and enveloped in the season's epitome of chic. Something made from Japan makes many people think of durability and quality, cornerstones that helped the Japanese take a sizable bite out of the car industry.

    Then there are the goods that come from China. Do kitschy toys and trinkets come to mind? Cute, fun, but do they suggest high quality and style? Increasingly, yes, but for many the answer is still: Hardly.

    It's precisely those perceptions that have precipitated some frame manufacturers to go to great lengths in order to get around stamping the true location of where their frames originate.

    "It took the Italians centuries to build a reputation for their fine craftsmanship in leathers and fabrics. If I buy a suit that is made in Italy, I expect something very different than if I buy a suit made in Taiwan. And if a suit says made in Italy when it was really made in Taiwan, and it starts falling apart, that's jeopardizing that country's reputation for quality craftsmanship that took years to build," says Claudio Gottardi of Sāfilo. "In essence, that's exactly what these companies are doing. They are jeopardizing our integrity."

    Believing that a frame marked Made in China will not command as much retail value, some companies have taken advantage of the nebulous language in the U.S. Customs' bylaws on country of origin marking rules for imported frames.

    According to U.S. Customs law, all goods produced outside the United States must be legibly marked with information concerning the country where the item is produced. Yet, there are exceptions to that rule falling under what U.S. Customs defines as "substantial transformation." SUBSTANTIAL FRAMES



    And what exactly does substantial transformation mean in the frame business? " According to U.S. Customs, mere assembly of a frame does not fall under that definition. Here's what U.S Customs Country of Origin Marking Rules for Imported Frames and Lenses says constitutes as substantial transformation:

    "Mere assembly of finished frame components is not a substantial transformation. If frame components are manufactured in country A and shipped to country B for finishing, a substantial transformation may occur only if a significant amount of processing is performed in country B. Those processes include: Multi-step processes such as soldering, drilling, bending, mitering, applying hinges and nosepads, as well as polishing raw frame components. In terms of the frame coloring process, mere dipping or dying does not constitute as substantial transformation. Again, multiple processes must occur. Those processes include: Cleaning, plating, applying lacquer, or coloring with syringes or spray guns. A three-staged baking process, and subsequent assembly of the frame also constitutes substantial transformation."

    Some find gray areas in this clause that are open to interpretation. But Harvey Ross, chairman of Viva Group International and member of Vision Council of America's country of origin task force, says the explanation is crystal clear. "It's perfectly legal when frame manufacturers produce a frame in China, but the frame's coloration and finishing process is done in Italy--in which case the frame can be legitimately be stamped Made in Italy," he explains. "But simply assembling a frame in a country other than where it's from is not considered substantial transformation, does not fall under the law, and, therefore, a frame company that does this is committing fraud--end of story."
    NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH



    This begs the question: If fraud is being committed, who are the ones policing the crime?

    Until recently, the only watchdog was U.S Customs. It's up to each customs official who is inspecting goods imported into the United States to question the recipient of the delivery on the genesis of the frame shipment's journey. If he or she feels there is a failure to comply with marking rules, the frame shipment can be impounded and civil and/or criminal penalties can be imposed.

    However, there are those in the optical industry who opine that U.S. Customs' control measures simply aren't sufficient As a result, in February of this year, VCA's Frame Council Division formed the country of origin task force with Mike Hundert, CEO and president of Rem Eyewear, heading the group as chairman, along with Claudio Gottardi, CEO and president of Sāfilo USA; Al Berg, co-president of Marchon; Harvey Ross, chairman of Viva International Group; and Suzie Aloss, president of Eyewear by Roi, as members of the team.

    "There are two reasons we feel it's important to crack down on the companies that are violating country of origin marking rules," says Hundert. "Number one: If they are selling a frame that says it's made in Italy when it's really made in China, they are cheating both the dispenser and the consumer because they are most likely overcharging them for that frame and pocketing more profit for themselves. Number two: By making every frame manufacturer accountable for its frames' country of origin, it at least evens our industry's playing field."

    In an effort to make more frame companies forthright, the task force has implemented a three-pronged strategy. "Our first step is to inform; our next step is to engage; and our last step is to enforce," says Hundert.

    The engagement part of the plan began last March at Vision Expo East when VCA distributed copies of the U.S. Customs Country of Origin Marking Rules for Imported Frames and Lenses to every exhibitor at the show. "By attempting to educate companies on exactly what the country of origin laws are, we are giving everyone the benefit of the doubt," says Hundert.

    Having done that, the task force's next step is to approach and engage those companies they believe have violated the country-of-origin laws. "This is obviously going to be the most awkward part of our plan, since we have to confront them about the fact that they are breaking the law," says Hundert.

    Nonetheless, he says he believes that if the companies violating the laws would come clean and stop what they are doing, it would be better for the industry as a whole. "That way we wouldn't have to go on to the third step, to enforce, which would require us to notify the federal government of the marking violations. If at all possible, we want to keep the federal government from getting involved, because that would mean customs would have to spend more time scrutinizing all frame shipments coming into the United States, which would in turn hurt every frame manufacturer because of slower deliveries." FRONTLINE REACTIONS



    As owner of four Jon Gruen Optika dispensaries in New York City, Long Island, and Connecticut, Jon Gruen observes that the dispenser is impacted by country-of-origin fraud most of all. "If I see that a frame is made in China and the frame wholesales for $120, I know the frame's markup has been significantly inflated and does not reflect its true value. A frame that's made in China should wholesale for $55--tops. And I know for a fact some frames stamped Made in Germany are really made in China, even though they wholesale for much more than $55. As a high-end dispenser, you have to be especially wary of this kind of deceit because you are putting your credibility as a purveyor of luxury goods on the line."

    In the mid range, the impact isn't so dramatic. Larry Simon, owner of a mid-priced dispensary, Simon Eyes Optical in Monroe Township, N.J., says he doesn't feel as influenced by the country-of-origin issue. "Since most of my customers are more value-conscious, they could care less where a frame is made, as long as it's durable. They are more influenced by my recommendation than anything else. The only thing that has changed for me is that I am less likely to deal with a new vendor that comes in off the streets. I only do business with the companies I've done business with for years because they've earned my trust, and I know they wouldn't cheat me."

    Even at the high end of the spectrum, Gruen notes that where a frame comes from holds very little weight with his clientele. "It's a frame's brand name that is much more likely to motivate the consumer to buy. We're giving a tiny inked stamp inside of a temple way too much power." REMOVING RED FLAGS



    On the rare occasion that a customer does ask about a frame made in China, Gruen takes the time for a little client re-education. He explains that China's frame technology has come up vastly the same way Japan's products gained a reputation for good quality years ago.

    Frames made in China aren't all bad, in fact in many cases, they are quite good, according to Hundert. "The Chinese have continued to reinvest in their frame making equipment, which has improved their frame quality with each passing year," notes Hundert.

    "In fact, China is the only place in the world that has fully integrated frame-making facilities, where you can put a frame together from start to finish under one roof. In Italy, France, and even Japan, there are specialists in a cottage industry, where there's one place that does nothing but soldering, one area for nothing but coloring, and so on. That efficiency alone helps bring down the cost of a frame considerably without compromising quality. So a frame made in China doesn't mean you're getting a product of inferior quality in this day and age." ENDING THE DEBATE



    In fact, Hundert says that if more dispensers--and their customers--knew just how good frames made in China really are, the whole country of origin debate would become a moot point. His advice? "Quit holding on to the misconception. Understand why frames made in China aren't necessarily of lesser quality than those made in Italy, France, Germany, or Japan. And pass that knowledge on to your customers. By doing so, some frame manufacturers will no longer feel compelled to use the inked stamp inside of a frame as a crutch to make a profit."

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  17. #17
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    Chesterfield and Polo Sport are my main mens lines for sunglasses.

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    Manuf. Lens Surface Treatments
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    Blue Jumper Made in China...........................

    In fact, China is the only place in the world that has fully integrated frame-making facilities, where you can put a frame together from start to finish under one roof. In Italy, France, and even Japan, there are specialists in a cottage industry, where there's one place that does nothing but soldering, one area for nothing but coloring, and so on. That efficiency alone helps bring down the cost of a frame considerably without compromising quality. So a frame made in China doesn't mean you're getting a product of inferior quality in this day and age."
    Example in another field:

    A company renting space in my industrial building stopped manufacturing flux coated welding rods last July because the chinese are supplying the same product at a quarter the price to the world market.

    One drawback for the chinese was that the product was also a quarter of the quality than then the product from above mentioned company.

    To solve the quality problem the chinese purchased the now disfunct coating machine (only 2 existing world wide) which was 30 years old, weighed 34 tons. It got partially dismantled loaded into three containers and shipped to China. I bet you all the tea in China that this machine will now be copied over there and they will supply first class flux coated welding rods at the cheaper price.

    In the optical field:

    Our optical frame manufacturers have sent their special machines to china already many years ago. The quality that comes out of China is NOT worse, actually it is the SAME as if made in Europe. They use the same basic materials which are either made in Europe or elsewhere until they figure out how to do it on their own.

    Actually when you go to a flea market and look at those readers in metal, that are sold for $ 1.00 including polycarbonate lenses, you will be surprised at the quality. (Never as good as an optical frame should be, but surprisingly close for the price)

    You guy's out there have been selling chinese frame for years believing they come out of Italy, France or Germany, continuing to pay the high Eurpean made price.............while the frame company pays the chinese price.
    Figure out yourself what gross profit your frame companies are making !!!!!!!!
    I know for how much these frames are going for in China and it is easy to find out yourself.

    Actually two of the older well known German frame manufactuerers, have been taken over by Moulin (Chinese) 2 years ago.

    The quality is the same, the basic materials are the same, and they use the original european machinery or copies of.

    FURTHERMORE:

    In the matter of lenses just about the same is happening. Just look at the lens envelopes and see were the lenses are made that come under brand names as ESSILOR< SOLA and others. Made in Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, China.....................but you still pay the old price increased by inflation.................while the manufacturer has heavily reduced his cost.
    Last edited by Chris Ryser; 02-04-2005 at 05:49 AM.

  19. #19
    OptiWizard Pogu's Avatar
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    Wiley X, Orvis, Columbia, XXL ophthalmic frames convert well, as do the larger Oga's and Miyagi's.

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    Rising Star n711's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan View Post
    I found several lines for women's sunwear to add to my dispensary, now I am looking for some good quality, resonable priced sunwear for men. I don't want Ray Ban,(lux product) and I don't want the high priced Hugo Boss either. I am looking for something able to be RXed and just a good value. Any help would be appreciated.
    Columbia suns for Men from L'Amy...they ALL come polarized! GREAT price point!!! And they sell like "hot cakes"
    ~N


    "The sands of time have already begun to pour against you.." ~Aaron D Yates

  21. #21
    Master OptiBoarder
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    Aspex came out with a new line of suns that i saw at expo and actually liked quite a bit. we use suntrends from i-deal as our value line, our cost is great and they hold up pretty well. the women's zyls can be a little questionable but their metals are nice and hefty :) they've come out with a lot of more fun styles too. aviators and all that jazz.
    "what i need is a strong drink and a peer group." ... Douglas Adams - Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy

  22. #22
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    Jaguar has been coming with some nice sun frames lately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan View Post
    Thanks for the info!! Has anyone tried the Poloroid frames from E'lite? Just got some info on it, not sure though. Thanks again!
    Hold on that thought. Polaroid got bought out from Safilo....the Elite is discountinued due to buy out, unless you can get them sold as such for cheap.

  24. #24
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    If you're looking for a good "sporty" line to fill the hole of Oakley or RayBans and they don't care about designer names, I highly reccomend L'Amy's Columbia line of sunglasses. They are all polarized and decent quality. Columbia is the label like the sporting goods company....all the frames have names of hiking summits.
    Last edited by SeaU2020; 05-17-2013 at 12:15 PM.

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