Page 8 of 47 FirstFirst ... 34567891011121318 ... LastLast
Results 176 to 200 of 1162

Thread: TIPS ON DISPENSING

  1. #176
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Lightbulb

    :hammer: This next tip is to try and get you to think what you are doing, which really involves asking the patient a lot about what they are going to be using the glasses for.
    ................As an example years ago in Gainesville, Georgia i had a lady buy a pair of glasses, normal everyday type rx. When i asked her what she did, she told me she sorted colors at a carpet factory. I took that to mean red, yellow, green , blue, etc.
    ................A couple weeks later she came back madder then hell, claiming i had caused her to pick the wrong color, because of the rose 2 tint she requested.
    .................Upon further questioning about how this could have happened, i then found out she sorted 60 shades of green, and this time picked the wrong shade, causing the company to manufacture a run of carpet the wrong color.
    ................ It was from that experience i learned to ask, and ask and ask, you can never learn too much.

  2. #177
    OptiBoard Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    stanford,ky,usa
    Posts
    7

    A few more tips

    Here are a couple more tips for you.
    Have you ever broken off one of those wonderful tap and snap screws in a customers frame and couldn't get it out? I always keep a pair of surgical hemostats available to get to tough screws or other problems, if that don't work there is the option of drilling, but those screws are hardened and most drills wont touch them, but you can get a set of carbide bits that will drill right through them. They are available online from Harbor Freight, I'm pretty sure. They cost about 15 dollars a set, but they break off REAL easy so wear eye protection.
    Do you have a set of chappel cutters with nicks all in it from cutting through hard temple ends or tap and snap screrws? This can be avoided by using a dremmel tool with a diamond cut off wheel, and you can use it at the same time to pin bevel the temple ends. Works like a charm!

  3. #178
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Thumbs down

    If you have for sale, those little plunger type contact lens removers, that are sold to remove hard contacts, you would probably be better off to get rid of them,as they can be dangerous. People have been known to insert the remover and not realize the contact was not there, and instead remove some of their cornea. Just another potential lawsuit you dont need.

  4. #179
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Lightbulb

    :cheers: I just saw today that great western optical, of which i have no ties to at all, announced a new tool for the purpose of mounting temple screws with spring hinges. It is a very unique tool, that looks like it would well be worth buying to save the frustration with these spring hinge temples. The tool is shown on page 80 of eyecare business, which i also have no ties to.
    ......Now, if i can just get them to send me one, i,d be glad to test it.

  5. #180
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Only City in the World built over a Volcano
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    12,998

    Spring hinges

    Harry:

    Save your money, get spring hinge screws from Hilco and use a screw retaining screwdriver to start. Your troubles will go away except possibly on very cheap Kenmark Gallery frames.

    Chip

  6. #181
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Lightbulb

    :hammer: Hers one of those will work in a pinch type tips. Your at home, the neighbor comes over with a metal frame that is bent out on the end pieces, and you havent got your end pliers. Simply take a common table fork, and stick the end piece between the tines and turn inward. Works like a charm.

  7. #182
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Lightbulb

    :D Ever get one of those snap in nose pads that was difficult to get out, and as your pulling on the pad, the whole pad arm moves. Simply take the pad arm and hold it with your snipes, and then use the pad popper and they will come right out and you wont break off the pad arm.

  8. #183
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Lightbulb

    :bbg: Ever have one of those snap in nose pads that was difficult to get back in, and as your pressing you get a dent in your finger. Simply take your double fiber jawed pliers, and with one of the jaws in back of the pad arm, and the other jaw touching the front of the pad, gently squeeze the pliers and the pad will go right in. Sometimes lining it up will take a few seconds.

  9. #184
    Master OptiBoarder Joann Raytar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    USA
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    4,948
    Anyone have any tips for getting RayBan style clip-on nose pads on easily? Does anyone have tips for getting those other pain in the neck pads on ... the ones that have a thin plastic oval tab in back that is parallel to the pad surface and slips inside an end curl in the pad arm? I don't know what the actual name of that type is.

  10. #185
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Question

    :idea: HI Jo, i think one of my previous posts covered crimp on pads. There are two ways, one is you can use your snipes, while holding the pad against the arm with your thumb and gently squeeze on side of the tab and then the other. What i found works best however is to use your screw on pad adjusting plier, in reverse, in fact i think it was even designed with that in mind. Simply hold the pad against the arm, put the flat part of the plier against the pad and now look around at the back and line up the two tabs where the back of the plier is touching both of them at the same time. Squeeze gently on both tabs at the same time so they fold over evenly. Takes doing a few times.
    ...........As far as those other pads go, i dont know what there called exactly, or who the genius was that invented them for what purpose, but i guess a good name would be PITA. As far as working with them what you have to do is take your snipes and gently open this curl of wire slightly. Then slip in the pad and very gently close the curl of wire. You have to do this carefully as if you slip you can break the pad rather easily.

  11. #186
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Only City in the World built over a Volcano
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    12,998

    For Jo and Harry

    Hilco has a plier just for crimping Ray ~Ban type pads. The trick is getting the old one off if over~crimped (which they always are). Also for some reason manufacturers always make both tabs the same lenght. If they knew what they were doing they would make one shorter so one would crimp over the other.

    Chip

    Harry

    Hilco also makes a nose~pad remover, cheap and works very well has a fork end and a press end. Slip the fork under pad and the press end pops it right out.

    Chip

  12. #187
    Master OptiBoarder Texas Ranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Republic of Texas
    Posts
    1,433

    Smilie

    If i'm changing a rayban type pad, I just cut one side posr with a cutting plier of course being careful not to nip the pad arm.

  13. #188
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Exclamation

    :idea: Al. you can save yourself a lot of trouble by just inserting the small end of your screwdriver, and slightly pry up the arms. Then just give it a twist and it will come right off.
    .........P.S. Darris Chambless all that texas knowledge and no tips.

  14. #189
    Master OptiBoarder Texas Ranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Republic of Texas
    Posts
    1,433

    Smilie

    Harry, used to do that, but most of them that we see are clamped down really tight and have some sort of culture growing over them! Justr don't want to handle them that much, just nip 'em and let them fall into the trash bin, run them in the ultrasonic cleaner solution, scrub them with an old tooth brush, then put on the new pads.

  15. #190
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Lightbulb Salt pans

    :idea: I think probably all of us today use glass beads rather then table salt as we did once upon a time. The glass beads come in two sizes. You will probably find the smaller ones work better, but the key is to really move the plastic around rather rapidly. so the glass bead does not cling to the frame leaving an indentation. You will find this real easy to do if you use the large beads as they are much heavier and thus will indent the frame much quicker.
    ........... I have seen talcum powder used to lessen the effect, but its also quite messy as is the salt.

  16. #191
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Only City in the World built over a Volcano
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    12,998

    Glass Bead

    Harry: The large beads work better from the standpoint that the small ones get into the groove in plastic frames and into hinge in all frames. Will screw up the works if undetected when mounting a lens or aligning a hinge. Incidentally, a co-worker of mine, Gerald Frankllin first got the idea of useing glass beads instead of salt (which can be rinsed out if under a lens when mounted) when a friend of his gave him a bucket of glass beads (which were made across the river from us by the Cataphote (earlier the Knox Glass company) company to coat reflective hiway signs.

    This probably accounts for the higher price on the large beads although there are less beads to the pound.

    Either will put lots of small "spots" on a lens if left in the salt (Glass bead) pan. These can be removed with air blower heat if found in lens.

    Chip

  17. #192
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Thumbs down

    :finger: Chip, sorry but i,m going to disagree with you on this one. First there is no excuse for glazing a lens into a frame when there is a bead in the groove. You simply just have to look. If the beads are sticking it is only because you have your pan too hot or you are not moving it around fast enough.
    ............As far as the hinges go if they are tight as they should be before you insert the frame into the salt pan it is almost impossible to get the bead in between the hinges, more especially with todays modern 3 barrel hinges.
    .........This use to be more of a problem in the old days of actual salt pans, when salt and water would get in there and cake up.
    .........It all boils down to prepping your frame before you work on it. The first thing i always do before working on a frame is to check all the screws and hinges and make sure they are tight.
    ............If a plastic frame comes in with a loose hinge to start with then you probably do not want to stick it in the salt pan as it might just come out all together. Also i have seen more end peices snapped off only because someone did not tighten down the screws.

  18. #193
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Lightbulb Duallens or exec,s

    :D This may be a no brainer for some of the old pros, but for the newer ones. This lens has both of these names,exec being what is used today. What makes this lens so difficult to keep in the frame is you have a lens with two different base curves. If the distance part is a 6BC and the add is a +3.00, you now have a 9.00D curve on the segment part. Henceforth this is why you see the ledge so dramatically, especially with your plus on plus lenses. One way i try to combat this problem is to go to a D-35 in a smaller frame. There is one common link between a D-35 and the exec, which is both have the OC on the line. This is not true with a D-28 or D-25. By using the D-35 in a smaller frame it will almost look like an exec, without the ledge, but your optics that the patient is used to will remain about the same.

  19. #194
    Master OptiBoarder Joann Raytar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    USA
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    4,948
    Harry, what are your thoughts on FT45's?

  20. #195
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Exclamation

    :( Personally Jo, i really do not favor them, as they lead to the same problem as the Exec,s, where you wind up with a ledge, only difference is now the ledge is on top. I suppose if it has one redeeming value it would be from the cosmetic standpoint in a very large frame it would proportion out more.
    ..........I also think that if a patient cant make it with a D-35, then the D-45 is not going to help
    .........Like always with these type lenses, the exec and the 45 the rx is going to play an all important part in how it looks, the minus lenses are going to look pretty good, but the plus lenses will look worse.

  21. #196
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Blue Jumper

    :cheers: I would like to inform everyone of a great little frame that i have used over the past two years with resounding success. It is made by Eddie Bauer and is called a MONTERREY. Comes in a few colors and at least two sizes. It has a pair of long and bowed temples, that makes it adaptable to the biggest men and women that will come into your dispensary. Its the large bow in the temple that really does the trick. I am sure there are other frames out there like this and something like this should be in everyones collection. It,s a real problem solver.
    .........Let me state for the record i do not work for EDDIE BAUER or SIGNATURE EYEWEAR.

  22. #197
    i've always found that Engelhardt frames give great flexibility for people with big heads, big noses, or both. failing this there is always Safilo to overcome the problems, although these are not as common,

  23. #198
    Doh! braheem24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    KOCF & 89ft ASL
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    3,829

    hydogen peroxide add-on

    Originally posted by harry a saake
    A little tip for your tools , especially your screwdrivers. If you want to keep them sterile so you dont pick up a germ when you slip and stab yourself, as we all have, keep them sitting in hydrogen peroxide while there not being used.


    keep in mind that if you like to use hydrogen peroxide, you have to keep it in a sealed container with no light since light brakes it down.


    ibrahim :+)

  24. #199
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    Big Smile hydrogen Peroxide

    :D Yes, one of the things i neglected to mention in that post, was it was probably a good idea to change it every couple of days
    ........Also it is not a bad idea to wipe down all the rest of your dispensing tools on a regular basis. Snipes and nose pad pliers will always be full of germs.

  25. #200
    Doh! braheem24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    KOCF & 89ft ASL
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    3,829

    re: rimless poly

    Originally posted by stephanie
    I was curious if anyone has a good way of getting poly out of a rimless once it has been groove. I absolutely hate this chore and would love to know how the rest of you out there do it. There must be a better way!!!
    Have a great day!!!
    Steph

    dont use water in the groover , and run the groover one extra time after it stops, then use a screwdriver/ pd stick works wonderful for me :+)


    Ibrahim

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. in home dispensing
    By Dannyboy in forum General Optics and Eyecare Discussion Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-12-2002, 06:45 PM
  2. Need some Marchon temple tips...
    By Pete Hanlin in forum General Optics and Eyecare Discussion Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-14-2002, 06:47 PM
  3. Alaska Opticianry Licensing Law Hit Hard
    By MVEYES in forum Professional and Educational Organizations Discussion Forum
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-04-2002, 09:27 AM
  4. Optical Dispensing News
    By Joann Raytar in forum General Optics and Eyecare Discussion Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-05-2002, 08:51 PM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-27-2001, 08:36 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OptiBoard is proudly sponsored by:
BC College of Optics, Younger Optics and Vision Equipment