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Thread: TIPS ON DISPENSING

  1. #1126
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    spring hinges

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Ryser View Post
    ..........Then I would suggest you find out your way.

    we all know how difficult it can be aligning spring hinges, and trying to get the screw in. The spring hinge will move easier and hold in position easier if you spray a little rubbing alcohol on the moving part first

  2. #1127
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    heres a tip for screw on nose pads, we all know the difficulty sometimes in alinging them.

    take a large safety pin ,or push pin, and put it through the hole on the pad, this will clean out any junk , and also slighty enlargen the hole, thus making it easier to get the screw thru the hole

  3. #1128
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    Great. Thanks for sharing.

  4. #1129
    One eye sees, the other feels. OptiBoard Silver Supporter
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    Quote Originally Posted by harry a saake View Post
    heres a tip for screw on nose pads, we all know the difficulty sometimes in alinging them.

    take a large safety pin ,or push pin, and put it through the hole on the pad, this will clean out any junk , and also slighty enlargen the hole, thus making it easier to get the screw thru the hole
    A reamer can also enlarge the hole, adding an extra level of satisfaction.

    http://ep.yimg.com/ay/yhst-591685299...sortment-9.gif
    Roberts Optical Ltd.
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  5. #1130
    Manuf. Lens Surface Treatments
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    ............also a reamer will also destroy the thread and the screw will not hold anymore.

  6. #1131
    One eye sees, the other feels. OptiBoard Silver Supporter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Ryser View Post
    ............also a reamer will also destroy the thread and the screw will not hold anymore.
    We ream the nose pad hole, not the pad arm hole, because sometimes it has extra material blocking the hole, and sometimes to increase the diameter of an aftermarket pad, when the hole is to small to accommodate a non-standard screw diameter. I wouldn't use a reamer to align the hole of the pads to pad arms, or the barrels of hinges because it will probably break, which I have done a few times. For that, Harry's suggestion of a safety pin would be a wiser choice.
    Roberts Optical Ltd.
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    Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself. - Richard P. Feynman

    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test before the lesson.



  7. #1132
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    Redhot Jumper We ream the nose pad hole, not the pad arm hole ........................

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Martellaro View Post

    We ream the nose pad hole, not the pad arm hole, because sometimes it has extra material blocking the hole, and sometimes to increase the diameter of an aftermarket pad, ...................



    Thank you, that makes good sense.

  8. #1133
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    This rx R -100 L -500DS is to be glazed into a rimless mount in CR39 eye size 52mm with no decentration. Centre substance of the L stock lens is 1mm. What centre thickness does the R lens need to have to give equal edge thickness?This rx R -100 L -500DS is to be glazed into a rimless mount in CR39 eye size 52mm with no decentration. Centre substance of the L stock lens is 1mm. What centre thickness does the R lens need to have to give equal edge thickness?

  9. #1134
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    A 52 mm -5.00 with a 1.0 edge will have a 4.2 edge in 1.53 tool index. A -1.00 with a center of 1.0 would have a edge of 1.6 therefore it would need a center thickness of 3.6 mm
    to have an edge of 4.2mm

  10. #1135
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    For frames that a person's skin eats away at, try heat shrink. It comes in all different colors.

  11. #1136
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    Redhot Jumper How to repair plastic frames (old repeat post) ....................

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Anderson

    Please elaborate on your post above and share what solvents, how much pressure, glues containing what (not containing what). How much heat for how long applied how? How much pressure?







    In the 1950's and before most frames were celluloid nitrate, I guess all the older folks in this forum now that. The young generation might not even have heard of it.

    In those day's we learned how to glue them back together because most people wanted the old glasses at least as a spare if the purchased a new one, and the others which had no money wanted them just fixed and wear them as long as possible.

    The secret of doing a good job, is NOT to use any glue whatsoever, but only revert to a solvent that will dissolve the plastic materials.

    The technique is to wet the 2 surfaces of the break so they start to dissolve by getting soft. This is done by dipping the surfaces and removing them right away, otherwise you flush the dissolved material away. You can also apply a drop after another after waiting 10 to 15 seconds before the next one. When the material is soft for about 1/2 to 1mm join it very gently together with minimal pressure. If you get an even bulge protruding at the joint you will have a perfect weld without any visible joint.

    Then let it dry overnight, and it in the morning sand off the bulge with first 100 grit sandpaper followed by 200 or higher grit. Then wipe some of the solvent used over it, to make it shiny, or use a buffer. If properly done you will not even see the breakage anymore as it has totally fused together.

    In order to hold the piece or pieces together, get some small pointed clamps that have a screw to hold the broken end pieces. These clamps can be mounted on a piece of wood, by drilling a hole and sticking them into the holes.

    When fusing a rim, you will make the rim slightly smaller and should do the fusing with the lens mounted. In order to does that pass the bevel on a hand stone and pass the bevel lightly on one turn to reduce the lens diameter by a quarter millimeter and insert the lens before joining the softened break. Always watch out that the visible bulge appears, otherwise the lens is still to large. Use the clamps for bridges and for rims use 2 rubber bands crossed over. Again next day do the finishing.

    In the old days on celluloid frames we used above steps with the help of acetone.

    However acetone will not work right on cellulose acetate of which most quality frames are made. For this we use an acidic acid mix which works beautiful to dissolve the surface of the breakage.

    For injected frames as Optyl and other polycarbonate related frames our “Drillseal” works perfectly to dissolve and fuse 2 surfaces.

  12. #1137
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    When mounting groove type lenses, more especially when they are minus, start the monofilament around the thickest part of the lens first, usually the temporal side

  13. #1138
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    Thought would share some of my little tips, some might have been covered previously but .... o well.



    When dispensing to Children, ask them their favourite colour initially. Then try and find a frame in that colour for them. Try and not "talk-down" to them or baby them. I usually spend most of the frame selection time on my knee's talking directly to the child. Try and let the child choose the glasses they want - This means that the child is more likely to wear the glasses instead of having them sitting in the case the whole time and the parents have wasted $$$. Many times i have seen a mother or father demand that the child wear a frame they do not like - in 90% of these cases i highly doubt they will ever get used.

    Another tip for children - Ask if its their 1st real pair of glasses. If it is, you can give them the "Golden Rules Of Glasses"

    1) After the glasses are made with your special magic lenses, the ONLY head in the whole wide world they are allowed to be on is YOURS. Not Your friends. Not your Brothers / Sisters. Just you as these are made special just for you!

    2) If they ever hurt you on your nose or your ears, Tell Mum/Dad and come in here and i will fix them just for you! Dont try it yourself!

    3) When taking them off and on, ALWAYS use 2 hands - otherwise the sides can get bent out of shape!

    4) When they are not on your face, PUT in the CASE!

    5) (To the Parent) - They will get knocked out of shape or twisted most likely - Kids will be Kids. Its not the end of the world. Bring them instore and let me fix them here. Dont try a home repair!


    Another tip i have for re-stringing Nyltag Frames - fit the line in the "harder access" edge 1st - place the lens in the frame and pull the line tight in the lens groove - with a marker pen then place a dot on the place where the line has to travel thru the frame. Then Fit to the harder side and pull the line until the marking you placed on the line is in the mid-point between the holes - you can then trim the overhang. This means you get the exact right size line 100% of the time. Takes a 10 minute job of fit - check - tighten - fit - check - tighten while trying to get the right length to just the 1st time.



    Another thing i do frequently with the higher Rx patients i will usually fit a pair of trial contact lenses in for the patient - Say if they are OD +5.75-0.75x180 i will put in a +5.00 contacts (usually a Alcon/Ciba Total1 daily - might be called different in your part of the world but thats what they are in Australia) for a couple of reasons. Firstly so the patient can actually see if frame on themselves alot better than no lenses in - might not be perfect vision but is better than nothing. Also it plants the seed of contact lens wear and another avenue of sales. Once the frame/lens selection has been worked out then usually i remove the contact lens for the patient so they can wear there current pair of specs.
    Last edited by azzathejunglist; 06-17-2016 at 07:04 PM.

  14. #1139
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    You can use a pen light to determine if the bridge is twisted on a frame. Simply shine the light on the bridge of the frame and compare the reflection points you will see in the lenses. They points should be horizontally aligned. The only exception would be if prism is involved.

  15. #1140
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    did u mean loosen the screws or not and i havent seen glass lenses in the usa that much where im from we still use glass i been looking for acouple of 1.9 high index glass lenses for my self in the usa and couldnt find them no where

  16. #1141
    Bad address email on file LisaRayes's Avatar
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    Proper dispensing of a pair of spectacles begins with an accurate prescription. It also includes guiding the patient to choose frames and lenses that are comfortable, affordable as well as aesthetically suitable. The quality of the lens and its fitting also affects the correction provided. In addition to these, proper counselling about use and maintenance can ensure proper uptake of the correction. It is important to design the optical dispensing system itself in order to make it sustainable and efficient.

  17. #1142
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    How can i adjust a rimless without breaking lenses ?
    What is the easiest way to do this ?

  18. #1143
    OptiBoard Professional Kujiradesu's Avatar
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    For drilled rimless it depends on which kind of fastener is holding the temple and bridge in place (plastic plug or screw). You will need a rimless bracing plier for whichever fastener the frame has. Brace the fastener and lens with the plier. I like Western Optical. I think they make a quality tool for almost everything:

    http://westernoptical.com/products/D...ing-plier.html
    http://westernoptical.com/products/D...atory-use.html

    Once your lens and fastener is braced you can adjust the temple or bridge as you would on any frame.
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  19. #1144
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    rimless

    Quote Originally Posted by Kujiradesu View Post
    For drilled rimless it depends on which kind of fastener is holding the temple and bridge in place (plastic plug or screw). You will need a rimless bracing plier for whichever fastener the frame has. Brace the fastener and lens with the plier. I like Western Optical. I think they make a quality tool for almost everything:

    http://westernoptical.com/products/D...ing-plier.html
    http://westernoptical.com/products/D...atory-use.html

    Once your lens and fastener is braced you can adjust the temple or bridge as you would on any frame.
    one solution is to put the temples in the two holes or one, and see if they flair out, if they do take it out and bend the metal endpiece in somewhat, and repeat first step, if they go back straight or a little inward, your probably ok, and now you can permantly mount it with the plastic bushings and you have put no pressure on the lens or bushings.

  20. #1145
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    screwdrivers and slippage

    probably the main reason for so much slippage and stabbing yourself, is due to how we perform the task. All too often speed is our biggest enemy, slow down, much less chance the blade will skip out of the slot. we all seem to be fascinated on how fast we can mount a screw, WHY?, and if your applying a lot of pressure it will slip faster and hurt you worse.

    second use the right blade size for the screw you are using, less chance of the blade skipping out of the screw head, there are a number of different size blades you can buy, and they are not terribly expensive.

    we tend to buy from hilco and places like that, but often hobby shops will have a better variety., also if you attend the trade shows, there are all kinds of items you can purchase, and probably a few you havent seen.

    but most of all SLOW DOWN and save your skin

  21. #1146
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    I like using those thin plastic strips that sometimes binds packages together. I cut them down so they are about 5 mm wide 8 - 10 cm long and cut a 45 degree angle on each end. This allows you to stuff that baby into even into the tightest semi-rims. Its also really easy to get a solid grip because they plastic is textured in a cross pattern.

  22. #1147
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    Quote Originally Posted by kintops View Post
    I like using those thin plastic strips that sometimes binds packages together. I cut them down so they are about 5 mm wide 8 - 10 cm long and cut a 45 degree angle on each end. This allows you to stuff that baby into even into the tightest semi-rims. Its also really easy to get a solid grip because they plastic is textured in a cross pattern.
    +1

  23. #1148
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    Here's a dispensing problem I have run into several times: my coworkers being unable to read ground-in prism in the lensometer. Labs are also awful about not grinding it into prescriptions. They neglect it, leading to many remakes. It has affected me personally on a few occasions. Recently I was in between jobs and bought new W3+ progressive lenses with AR at my local optometrist's office. I have a decent amount of prism: 2.5 D BI OU. Soon after receiving the lenses I complained to the optical about having trouble seeing. My refractive correction is weak, but this time I paid for a roll and polish due to the unbalanced center thickness which dug into my small nose. I brought them back to the optical, and they told me the Rx was fine; my complaints were all my imagination, and if I was still having problems, I needed to pay for an upgrade to an S or an X to reduce the difficulties I was having. I just gave up wearing them and went back to wearing my old glasses, since I was going to get a new job and could get new glasses soon anyway. But I kept thinking something was off on the RX.

    Fast forward three months. I had barely worn the glasses. I suspected there wasn't any prism but wasn't sure because of the roll and polish. Two days after I started the new job my lab manager and I checked them under the lensometer and sure enough: no prism. I am so angry. The office knew I am an optician, knew I am picky, and the prism is prescribed for a reason! When I called them, they didn't even apologize. They just said, "Well, the optician must not have read the prism." And she not only didn't read it once, but twice. It's being remade, but I missed out on three months of the better vision with the new Rx. I'm an optician, I know people make mistakes, and I understand that. If it needed remade at the outset, that's fine. But why don't opticians know how to read prism? It's not hard but only rarely do opticians know how to read it. And if you don't know how to read it, at least ask the optometrist to do it. And do not suggest to the customer that they are crazy if you haven't even read the prescription! Please opticians, learn how if you don't know. It's not common in prescriptions, but when it's there, it's just as much a part of the Rx as the refractive error correction.

  24. #1149
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    Hold lenses with prism a meter away from a board with centimeter thick lines, you can then see if they have prism in them, especially if they have as much as 2.5 with a weak refractive error to boot !

    Sorry I couldn't have told you that before you got a job again with a lensmeter. For some of us doing prism jobs almost seems a daily occurrence.

  25. #1150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tallboy View Post
    Hold lenses with prism a meter away from a board with centimeter thick lines, you can then see if they have prism in them, especially if they have as much as 2.5 with a weak refractive error to boot !

    Sorry I couldn't have told you that before you got a job again with a lensmeter. For some of us doing prism jobs almost seems a daily occurrence.
    Thanks for the tip. I did not know that, only how to read it on the manual lensometer.

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