Page 38 of 48 FirstFirst ... 283334353637383940414243 ... LastLast
Results 926 to 950 of 1184

Thread: TIPS ON DISPENSING

  1. #926
    OptiBoard Novice DeniseC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Glendale, AZ
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by uncut View Post
    Welcome DeniseC:

    initiation/hazing.....you got to read the whooooollle thing! We will ask questions later.
    sheesh!! I will get busy! I only have 4 more years worth of posts to go.... lol

  2. #927
    OptiBoard Novice DeniseC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Glendale, AZ
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by chip anderson View Post
    While watching "Cool Tools" I learned that titanium (tools in this case) does not get hot in the sun as other metals do. I assume this has something to do with this being why it was selected by the Skunkworks for the Blackbird and why we can't weld and solder it by ordinary means.

    Chip
    Chip, this is great thing to know for an optician that has recently relocated to Arizona! Thanks for the great selling tip!

  3. #928
    Bad address email on file
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Iowa
    Occupation
    Optical Laboratory Technician
    Posts
    2
    If your having a problem with streaking while tinting lenses with a gradient tint, try tinting them solid first and then while they are right-side up, stick them in your neutralizer and take the bottom half of the tint out.

    If your having problems with cracking lenses, it could be due to old wheels cutting the lenses, the lenses are too big or the curve of the frame doesn't match the curve of the lenses. I know certain frames are really unforgiving to polycarbonate lenses so sometimes putting the person in plastic or high-index is your best bet. Plastic lenses are more pliable when it comes to taking the shape of the frame.

    If you find a huge scratch in a lens while final inspecting, sometimes you can save the lens by repolishing it and coating it. You have to tape both sides of the lens and then you can use a handstone and go around the backside of the lens to remove the tape for polishing. After taping, reblock it up and polish it for 4-6 minutes and when you go to recoat the lens, retape it the same way and use leap pads to hold the lens to the suction cup. This sometimes works but you run the risk of having coating spots around the edge of the lens which may or may not be removed with a heavier safety bevel. Smaller and less noticeable scratches can usually be hidden with a china marker, just make sure no debris is on it before marking the lens or you could put a heavier scratch in the lens.

    Something really simple for adjusting plastic frames: After heating up the frame and bringing the temples in or whichever adjustment you're making, run it under cold water for a couple of seconds while still holding it in place. It helps keep the frame from bouncing back to its original position.

    Hope these help!

  4. #929
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    bench checking

    When recieving glasses to be nuetralized for accuracy, it is probably best to bench align the frames, as you would dispense them. This way you are more assured of the lenses sitting properly on the lens table, and the lens stop, holding the lens as straight as possible. Tilts in any direction can cause a false reading, both in power and axis.

  5. #930
    OptiBoard Novice
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    usa
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    5
    Not sure if this has been covered or not but... for progressive marks or some films, dip a q-tip in lemon extract and rub. Safe for any type of lens even poly and AR coated. Smells good too! I now use it at home for anything. Even gets paint off!

  6. #931
    OptiWizard
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    313
    The tip with the lemon juice is a killer! And it works too!

  7. #932
    Bad address email on file
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    detroit, michigan
    Occupation
    Other Optical Manufacturer or Vendor
    Posts
    1
    I too was once plagued by this issue. But I have come up with an effective technique.

    * once you have put the spring and ball bearing back in there posituon, take the temple and grasp it with your fingers. As your thumb is still free; using your thumb nail, put it in the gap at the head of the screw and rest the threaded tip of the screw just inside the top loop hole of the female hinge assembly. Hold it this way.(the screw threads should act as grips when wedged inside the top loop and against the top edge of the upper loop hole of the female hinge assembly)

    * find a smooth study strong flat surface to press against.(be sure to use a soft strong cloth to protect the frames finish from being marred or damaged in any way as any hard surface can damage a frame if force is applied and the frame isn't protected. Eyeglasses polishing cloths are perfect for this type of task, and you may even want to fold them just to give the frame more cushion for bracing to further protect them from damage)

    * now place the fronts(lens assembly of the frame) male hinge loop into the female part of the hinge loop assembly at the front of the temple where you are wedging the screw in at.

    * with the power of ur arm, slowly and carefully apply pressure to force the ball bearing into the spring which should compressed the spring.(be sure to keep your hands sturdy and still as the spring could accidentally fire the ball bearing which could result in a lost ball bearing! If yor have bad nerves you may want to have a person with a more steady hand do this for you.)

    * (if you have done this correctly, you should have aligned the linkage of the entire hinge assymbly, both male and female.) Now that you have aligned the entire hinge assymbly, you should be able to see a small but clear pin size view through the screw hole. Once you can see that; in one motion using your thumb, push forward and down to guide the screw into place to be screwed in. Continue to push it in and wiggle the screw with your thumbnail while you still have the spring compressed until it seams as if it is going in as far as it will without being forced and or damaged. Now just screw it in. (you may have to drive the screw with a eyeglass screwdriver while the spring is still compressed against the hard surface as the tension may press up against the screw when it is in place and u have stopped forcing it against the hard surface which may result in the screw being driven in crooked.)

    NOTE: Do not take the lenses out of the frame if the frame is full rim or half rimless as the lenses are a part of the frames integrity that supports it.

    NOTE: If you find your self dealing with a frame where the male part of the hinge assembly is on the temple instead of the fronts(lens assembly of the frame) simply switch the two different frame parts in all the steps and also wrap a additional polishing cloth around the fronts to help protect them from your hand better, if you follow that additional step, the whole task should go just as fast!

  8. #933
    Master OptiBoarder pseudonym's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NC
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    646
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseC View Post
    I'm new to this board, so forgive me I didn't go through all of the years of "tips" yet. But for the 'New' opticians replacing nosepads with screws can be a challenge until they are really comfortable with a screwdriver. If you wedge a business card between the nosepad arm and the lens, if the screwdriver slips you won't scratch the lens :)
    This can also be helpful if you've had WAY to much coffee.
    Great suggestion that I will use in the future. The only thing with nosepads that gives me trouble is when I've forgotten to clean out the odd piece of plastic that often gets wedged in the guard arm. I usually remember it when the screw won't close down completely, then have to backtrack and clean it out.

    What I need is a tip for getting the bushings out of Silouette type frames without gouging the lens. I've only gouged one, but it was not an experience I'd care to repeat. I have my suspicions that some of you are actually gluing the bushings in to vex me.

  9. #934
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by harry a saake View Post
    The purpose here is to start a thread, that if it works Steve will put in a permanent file. Steve informed me that starting a new forum was difficult with this software as once you do it you cant remove it.The purpose here is to pass along to others all the little tricks of the trade , that has anything to do with dispensing. There are quite a few old timers like myself, Al, Bob and a number of talented opticians of all ages on this board.In light of that i am going to start off with a relatively easy one dealing with the removal of a screw from a metal frame, that wont seem to come out. Quite often if you heat it slightly in a salt pan, then turn it slightly to the right , and then to the left the screw will come out. I am going to try and post at least one new tip a week, until i run out,and i challenge the rest of you to do the same and maybe we can make this a thread to remember
    This is a really great idea. Congrats for thinking of it:). I think the part with the screw can be solved with some oil and a bit of patience. After a few minutes you can try to turn it round and round. I can wait for the next useful triks.

  10. #935
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Nelson View Post
    But wouldn't that involve (gasp) some hand edging? Is it possible to do some work by hand these days? ;)
    Don't we all have to know to solve some things with our own hands? These are saint:).

  11. #936
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by chip anderson View Post
    Also welding the tounge in the spring sleve works. On some just peening it will last until replacement temple arrives.
    Interesting and funny in the same time. Who would have thought that you can find a solution in this way?:)

  12. #937
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by bmommy View Post
    Not sure if this has been covered or not but... for progressive marks or some films, dip a q-tip in lemon extract and rub. Safe for any type of lens even poly and AR coated. Smells good too! I now use it at home for anything. Even gets paint off!
    This is really interesting. I tried it and...it worked smoodly, even if the smell it pricks your nose a bit.

  13. #938
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    From the tips&tricks way...what's the best way to clear the lenses of the glasses, except a liquid dishes detergent or a deer leather? And when the lether is freting what can you do?

  14. #939
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by edKENdance View Post
    Ok then. By the same token. What if a longer temple length needed to be ordered and you only found this out at the final fitting? Same deal. Not so much an inconvenience to me at closing time because I'm already there aren't I? Again, it's the client who has to wait for you.
    As much as I'm sure it's a pleasure for your clients to sit and watch you snip and file their temple tips while they are noticeably feeling uncomfortable because other people are waiting for adjustments and dispensings as you're doing work that could have been done before they even got there, "man".
    Ok, i think it shoud be appropriate and fair for all the board's members to keep the conversations and the replies in topics and to put away all the frustration. Everyone has good and bad days, but the others aren't guily for this. Aren't we all grown and mature people?

  15. #940
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    [QUOTE=finefocus;297142][QUOTE=vic4eyes;297139][QUOTE=Jo;8063]

    Now my search for an answer. What is anyone's method for removing a lens from a grooved rimless mount whithout chipping it when it is in there good and extra snug.

    90% of these lenses can be mounted or unmounted with your fingernail. If it's too tight for that, use a scalpel to cut the line between the holes in the eyewire, then restring. Lots faster and safer.
    I think that if it's too tight you have to put some oil on it and then to try with the nail. If it doesn't work, the best way is to find a small screwdriver and to do your job.

  16. #941
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    Ok, it's my last reply to this topic, because i don't want to become a spammer, but...why isn't made a special topic for tips if it was a request and if there are so many repleis in here? Can't this be done in here? It would be really interesting.

  17. #942
    OptiBoard Professional
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Romania
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by HenryB View Post
    Try grabbing the lens with turning pliers and turning it just enough to make a small gap. Then stick your choice of "rimless cord" in the gap and take em out.......

    In cases where the lens is REALLY tight, I have found that it can be easier to cut or break the string....yea I know restringing is no fun, but it beats remaking an expensive lens. (be careful doing this, you can do more harm than good if you use brute strength)
    Great and pointed information. i had the same problem.

  18. #943
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    lake norman, north carolina
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    2,099

    bifocals

    When measuring for seg heights, always remember that you lose about or at least 1mm because of the eyewire, with the exception of rimless, or semi rimless frames. This can be even more important, and probably is with your progressive wear lenses.

    With a line bifocal, if you measure 20 high, you will be able to use at least 19mm. With a progressive if there is 10mm of actual full power segment, you may have only 9mm, and in short corridor progressives, situation may even be worse.

    Thus this is the reason i like to fit progressives with a B measurement of no less then 27mm. thus i came up with a little rhyme.

    27 can be heaven
    28 is probably great
    29 is mighty fine

  19. #944
    OptiBoard Apprentice
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bellevue,Mi
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    31
    Spring hinge sprung? This repair requires a drill with a fine bit(1.0-1.4mm) and a tap just larger than your drill bit. If the broken stub of the hinge will slide back into the barrel and is thick enough, you can drill straight down between both pieces while holding both tightly together. Tap the hole carefully and insert a screw of the right width. Remove temple and round off squared corner of the hinge on the frame's endpiece if it has one. Neato completo and the patient still has working glasses with original temples. Spring no longer works and I only advise this on frames that are not going to a manufacturer for credit. Hope this helps save a few pair, but I do advise practicing on a couple old pair first.

  20. #945
    Rochester Optical WFruit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Occupation
    Optical Wholesale Lab (other positions)
    Posts
    1,273
    Quote Originally Posted by pseudonym View Post
    What I need is a tip for getting the bushings out of Silouette type frames without gouging the lens. I've only gouged one, but it was not an experience I'd care to repeat. I have my suspicions that some of you are actually gluing the bushings in to vex me.
    Hilco Pliers, part 21/454/0000. http://www.hilco.com/catalog/catalog...internal&refpg=

    I use these extensively and they work very well.
    There are rules. Knowing those are easy. There are exceptions to the rules. Knowing those are easy. Knowing when to use them is slightly less easy. There are exceptions to the exceptions. Knowing those is a little more tricky, and know when to use those is even more so. Our industry is FULL of all of the above.

  21. #946
    ATO Member HarryChiling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Nowhereville
    Occupation
    Other Eyecare-Related Field
    Posts
    7,765
    Quote Originally Posted by vintagetie View Post
    Spring hinge sprung? This repair requires a drill with a fine bit(1.0-1.4mm) and a tap just larger than your drill bit. If the broken stub of the hinge will slide back into the barrel and is thick enough, you can drill straight down between both pieces while holding both tightly together. Tap the hole carefully and insert a screw of the right width. Remove temple and round off squared corner of the hinge on the frame's endpiece if it has one. Neato completo and the patient still has working glasses with original temples. Spring no longer works and I only advise this on frames that are not going to a manufacturer for credit. Hope this helps save a few pair, but I do advise practicing on a couple old pair first.
    A 1.0 nose pad screws will look very inconspicuous as well, great first post. Welcome.

  22. #947
    OptiBoard Apprentice
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    48
    Ever have trouble getting a flex / memory metal temple to hold a bend? Take off the temple cover, using a butane torch heat the area you want to bent until it turns red (don't over do it, just until it turns red, then stop) let it air cool. Put the cover back on and make your bend. It will hold it's shape nicely. What your doing is annealing the metal and making it softer.
    B.A., ABOM, NCLE, Independent Optician



  23. #948
    Master OptiBoarder
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Down in a hole!
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    13,055
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Ever have trouble getting a flex / memory metal temple to hold a bend? Take off the temple cover, using a butane torch heat the area you want to bent until it turns red (don't over do it, just until it turns red, then stop) let it air cool. Put the cover back on and make your bend. It will hold it's shape nicely. What your doing is annealing the metal and making it softer.
    This is one time that you should NOT use your fingers as an adjusting tool!!!

  24. #949
    OptiBoard Novice
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Woodstock
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    3
    What I need is a tip for getting the bushings out of Silouette type frames without gouging the lens. I've only gouged one, but it was not an experience I'd care to repeat. I have my suspicions that some of you are actually gluing the bushings in to vex me.
    You could also try just putting scotch tape around the bushings/drill holes so you protect the lens while handling it. It's also what I do when I'm mounting the bushings with the temple. I seriously marred the lens when I was mounting my first Silhouette because our "universal" mounting tool was worn out.

  25. #950
    OptiBoard Apprentice
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Grove City Ohio
    Occupation
    Dispensing Optician
    Posts
    13

    Big Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by harry a saake View Post
    Try this as one of many methods to keep screws from backing out. As you all know almost any metal frame when you back out the screw tends to spring apart. I always take the frame and lightly bend the eyewires until the barrels meet together with no gap. Now when you screw it together not only will it go together easier, but there is no tension on the screw from the eyewire. Add a little loctite and you wont see that patient in for a missing screw very often.
    I have found that clear nail polish works well. The trick is to back the screw out a bit and add the nail polish to the inside of the barrels and then tighten screw. The polish will coat the threads and when it dries will seal nicely.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. in home dispensing
    By Dannyboy in forum General Optics and Eyecare Discussion Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-12-2002, 06:45 PM
  2. Need some Marchon temple tips...
    By Pete Hanlin in forum General Optics and Eyecare Discussion Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-14-2002, 06:47 PM
  3. Alaska Opticianry Licensing Law Hit Hard
    By MVEYES in forum Professional and Educational Organizations Discussion Forum
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-04-2002, 09:27 AM
  4. Optical Dispensing News
    By Joann Raytar in forum General Optics and Eyecare Discussion Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-05-2002, 08:51 PM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-27-2001, 08:36 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •