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    Omnilux....

    Has anyone tried the new Ominlux? I have fit several patients and am will NEVER fitting a Progressive again. Out of myself and 10 patients that I have fit, there has been NO push back. In fact, three patients want an additional pair. I have tried them and WOW. Having tried virtually every Progressive on the market...these are DIFFERENT! NO Distortion, NO limiting Mid Range and NO swim effects. I am now migrating Bifocal and Trifocal wearers to the lens.

    Thoughts?

    #2
    their website seems so gimmicky to me... i dont really get how its different from like a modified shamir relax lens?

    Comment


      #3
      The website may not be very well put together, and I understand English is not their first language, but it is not gimmicky at all. The OmniLux NAL it isn't even close to the Shamir Relax, for which I've tried and am a permanent non-adapt (as I am so far w/ all other PAL designs, on which I have finally given up!).
      Last edited by brucekrymow; 03-08-2024, 01:19 PM.
      Optivision LLMS Lab Software
      Optivision, Inc.
      602.277.2614 x2

      www.optivision.com
      www.digitaltrace.net
      bruce@optivision.com

      Comment


        #4
        I thought Quest labs in Fl developed and sells this lens.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by kdw613 View Post
          Has anyone tried the new Ominlux?
          I personally wear the QLDS OmniLux HD Digital NAL myself - I love 'em!


          The OmniLux NAL is not really new and have been around a little while, but I'm a huge skeptic and poo-poo'd them when I first heard of them. Like many folks, I chalked it up to the typical over-marketing BS we often see/hear/read, and then further credibility degradation as a result of spec/info-misunderstanding, under-education, and/or improper use-fitting by optical practice providers.


          The NAL synopsis denotes it is not a bifocal, not a trifocal, and not a PAL. The NAL lenses provide a SV viewing experience w/ continuous, sharp, natural vision at any gaze from distance to near w/o waves or distortions. There is no adaptation period, no peripheral swim effect, and no fitting height required! Because NAL mimics natural accommodation, it eliminates eye fatigue, provides clear natural instinctive vision in all distances, the visual fields don't have that dumb hour-glass shape, and the wide intermediate provides effortless mid-range navigation, smoothly connecting visual fields to provide natural vision from infinity to 14" or so.


          In the past 20+ years, I have never been able to get properly fit into any PAL ever, and I'm in the industry and have tried all of them, so believed I was a permanent PAL-non-adapt. Being a -9.00OU for Distance w/ a moderate Cyl of -1.25, I typically wear contacts (always aspheric to dial out some of the Cyl since torics blow), but now at age 58, am more of an established presbyope.


          Then some long-time friendly colleagues, Robin (RIP) and Yoav @ QLDS, talked me into just trying the NAL, and then made a pair for me. I committed to wearing them for a full 10 days non-stop, but honestly, my expectations were very, very low and thought them to be more of the same marketing over-hype we often see ('specially w/ the likes of EssLux). But gosh darn it and call me a blue-nose gopher.... I was super impressed and ended up loving them! Easy to see, no line, no jump, so swim, no bad spots, no moving my fat head around to find a sweet spot, etc... just good natural accommodation. I would personally characterize them as a high-def, no-line bifocal, w/ no jump.


          I became so enamored w/ the QLDS NAL that I perhaps all-too-frequently talked about them, and so I started buying them for my family, friends, and colleagues that had similar experiences. I did so as a gifting favor since so many people I know have been sucked into the over-marketed PALs that were never properly fit, hated them, and so no one trusts anything. But the result has been 100% adaptation & love so far. So, I guess I'm doing a little QLDS NAL grassroots movement...LOL!


          Anyway, my only suggestion is: Try Them. Get QLDS to fabricate you a free sample pair and assay away!

          fin.




          FYI: Optivision is an international LMS provider for all types of optical labs of any size, and we support all conventional and freeform/digital lens designs equally for all of our lab clients - this particular design just happens to be my personal fav since PALs failed me for decades as a high myope.
          Optivision LLMS Lab Software
          Optivision, Inc.
          602.277.2614 x2

          www.optivision.com
          www.digitaltrace.net
          bruce@optivision.com

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by optical24/7 View Post
            I thought Quest labs in Fl developed and sells this lens.
            You are correct, sir.

            Other labs also process QLDS designs in-house as they can do w/ any other digital lens design.
            Optivision LLMS Lab Software
            Optivision, Inc.
            602.277.2614 x2

            www.optivision.com
            www.digitaltrace.net
            bruce@optivision.com

            Comment


              #7

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by optical24/7 View Post
                My biggest concern is not needing a vertical height. It’s recommended to correct uncomfortable gaze positions by adjust the panto and or vertex and/or nose pad for height. Some frames this could be a challenge, like most plastics. I’m not dismissing it, Quest is top notch at pushing the edge of feasible. But until I try one, ( cough, cough, courtesy), or saw a spectrum of different Rx types adaption, it makes me…not sure, but curious..
                I have exactly the same concern. We had been in contact with Jeremy at Quest about those lenses about 6 months ago. When I found out that you can't specify vertical/seg height and saw those recommendations, I lost interest to be honest. He did offer a complimentary pair, but we didn't take him up on it.

                Sounds like it might be good lens for internet orders, possibly even designed for that.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Here's the white paper:



                  At it's most basic, the concept seems to be something like a Camber blank, just backside? May try a pair to see how it feels on these old eyes. Of course, the marketing used paints even modern PALs as some sort of horrid ancient optical torture device, rife with "swim and distortion", the buzz words of every powerpoint slide bemoaning PALs since their inception. I've not seen "swim and distortion" be even a minor factor with almost any of the better lenses now for close to 20 years. And if you're struggling at all in taking a proper PD or seg height, the problem isn't with the lens design... *shrug*
                  Last edited by Uilleann; 03-11-2024, 10:16 AM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you Uilleann.

                    It's "just" a inverted triangle design. It seems those designs are intermediate-optimized.

                    If the near zone is wide enough, I guess it would work for general purpose.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      A Definity 4.0 analogy then?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by optical24/7 View Post
                        My biggest concern is not needing a vertical height. It’s recommended to correct uncomfortable gaze positions by adjust the panto and or vertex and/or nose pad for height. Some frames this could be a challenge, like most plastics. I’m not dismissing it, Quest is top notch at pushing the edge of feasible. But until I try one, ( cough, cough, courtesy), or saw a spectrum of different Rx types adaption, it makes me…not sure, but curious..
                        The vertical height is not required because the lens design system automatically adjusts the design based off a few factors including the closest distance between the lenses, the B measurement and the shape of the frame. It does require a tracing in order for the design to be placed properly. The Omnilux is not a progressive lens it is a different multifocal concept which was granted the first US utility patent for multifocal vision since the original progressive lens under the Natural Accommodation lens or NAL. It is recommended to have about 10-12 degrees of panto but that is pretty standard for any free form lens. I would be more than happy to make you a pair to try because we can say all of this but to show it isn't just marketing we recommend you experience it for yourself. If you send me an email at Jeremy.G@QuestOpticalLab.com we can work out getting you a sample pair at no cost.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Elvis Is Alive View Post
                          I have exactly the same concern. We had been in contact with Jeremy at Quest about those lenses about 6 months ago. When I found out that you can't specify vertical/seg height and saw those recommendations, I lost interest to be honest. He did offer a complimentary pair, but we didn't take him up on it.

                          Sounds like it might be good lens for internet orders, possibly even designed for that.
                          At this point we have made thousands of pairs with great success and it is being dispensed all over the US, Canada, Trinidad, Central & South America, UK and Israel. We do still recommend the lenses be dispensed because it still requires things like 10-12 degrees of panto, positive facial wrap and at least a 32 B (we recommend 34 but can go down to 32). The offer still stands if you want to try it for yourself. Email me at Jeremy.G@QuestOpticalLab.com if you are interested.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Uilleann View Post
                            Here's the white paper:



                            At it's most basic, the concept seems to be something like a Camber blank, just backside? May try a pair to see how it feels on these old eyes. Of course, the marketing used paints even modern PALs as some sort of horrid ancient optical torture device, rife with "swim and distortion", the buzz words of every powerpoint slide bemoaning PALs since their inception. I've not seen "swim and distortion" be even a minor factor with almost any of the better lenses now for close to 20 years. And if you're struggling at all in taking a proper PD or seg height, the problem isn't with the lens design... *shrug*
                            It is nothing like a Camber lens because with Camber they use a molded blank with part of the add power on the front side of the lens and then grind a free form IOT progressive design on the backside of the lens. The Omnilux is a Natural Accommodation Lens that was granted a utility patent for multifocal vision in 2022. It's not just another progressive lens design it is a different concept in multifocal vision that corrects for all focal lengths on a 22mm power progression back bone. Which is why it doesn't have any peripheral distortion/swim, doesn't require an adaptation period and also eliminates the eye fatigue you sometimes get with progressive lenses. I have spoken to a number of people in our industry who still struggle with progressive lenses and others who accepted them because there were no other options until now unless you wanted a lined bifocal/trifocal. I would be happy to make you a pair to show you the difference. If interested email Jeremy.G@QuestOpticalLab.com

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by drk View Post
                              Thank you Uilleann.

                              It's "just" a inverted triangle design. It seems those designs are intermediate-optimized.

                              If the near zone is wide enough, I guess it would work for general purpose.
                              I think referring to it as "just" an inverted triangle is oversimplifying it. It does have a more funnel shape than the "hourglass" design of a progressive but instead of having 3 zones (near, inter, distance) it has a power progression ramp that covers 22mm of the lens. This power progression backbone uses a mathematically created curvature based on natural downward gaze focal length deceleration requirements to correct for all focal lengths from 20ft to 1ft with one continuous curve through the lens. This is why the patented name is for the Natural Accommodation Lens. I would be happy to provide a pair for you to see the difference. Email me at Jeremy.G@QuestOpticalLab.com if you are interested.

                              Comment

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