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    Blue light protection

    Okay fellow optiborders

    I have been looking into various different blue light coatings and treatments. I am finding their is a lot out their but lens technology has yet to catch up with research. I am looking for the best product for my patients. I am curious about what others out their do for products and opinions.

    Thanks
    Dan

    #2
    We use a total of three different options.

    Essilors Prevencia Coating.
    VSP Unitys TechShield.
    Zeiss Duravision Blue Protect.

    Between you and me, when this technology & products started rolling out years ago, a brand ambassador for Essilor told me that it was all bs and unless you have been wearing blue light protection since birth that chances are it has already affected you.

    It works great in my demographic area, all my patients are all engineers, so besides the occasional pain in the butt patient wanting a -7.00 in a silhouette, they love the blue light tech spiel.
    Last edited by King of the Lab; 11-04-2017, 12:01 PM.
    Erik Zuniga, ABOC.

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      #3
      In-mass tinting should be on the table also. See Mitzu Chemical's UV+420 cut http://uv420cut.com.

      Available from Luzerne Optical. http://www.luzerneoptical.com/pdf/th...sell-sheet.pdf

      It's the nicest looking product in this category, and the most effective.

      IMO, we shouldn't make any medical claims WRT blue light.

      Best regards,

      Robert Martellaro
      Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself. - Richard P. Feynman

      Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test before the lesson.


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        #4
        Shamir has a new materials called Blue Zero. It is available in poly, trivex and 1.67 no additional cost. Can just specify Blue Zero material in the order notes. I like it with the Glacier+UV a/r coat-Very Clear!

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          #5
          I was looking into the TheraBlue, I will look into the Mitzu lenses. I was never a fan of the AR an coatings treatments, they really don't do much.

          Comment


            #6
            We offer different levels of protection based on needs.

            BluTech is for those wanting the BEST protection and for the light sensitive. The color makes it less appealing for a primary pair- for those who care.
            Hoya's Recharge is great for people who have an extended amount of screen time, especially at night, but works well on an everyday pair as well.
            Transistions are another great way to protect in an everyday pair. No blue blocking AR needed with this unless you are trying to effect sleep patterns.

            BUT the ultimate protection comes from...... POLARIZED SUNWEAR. This is soooo much more important than any coating. So don't forget about sunglasses when people ask about blue light protection.

            Keep in mind, any material filter is only helping with eyestrain- no medical benefits.

            If you have patients with deteriorating eye health then any of the above options are good to talk about.



            As a side note- I do believe there are a lot of people (manufacturers) pushing these options more than necessary. I have had many people come in with Recharge listed under recommendations from the doctor when a few simple questions can easily reveal they really don't need it.

            That being said. I am a BluTech wearer. I absolutely love how relaxed it makes my eyes and I have yet to find something that is so effective for night driving for the light sensitive.
            Have I told you today how much I hate poly?

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              #7
              I know this doesn't help the OP, but someday we're going to "find out" that lack of blue light causes dental cavities, hair loss, and sterility....and we're gonna be sorry.

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                #8
                Could you expand on this, I am curious,

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by robert martellaro View Post
                  ...imo, we shouldn't make any medical claims wrt blue light.

                  Best regards,

                  robert martellaro
                  1,000 x this!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Proof that blue light interferes with sleep.... Have you ever laid in bed at night holding your smart phone above your head, reading some drivel click bait on Facebook?...and you start to doze off?... And you drop your phone and it crashes right into your face? Damn! Wakes me up every time.

                    Gotta get me some blue tech glasses and see if it will help.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by fjpod View Post
                      Proof that blue light interferes with sleep.... Have you ever laid in bed at night holding your smart phone above your head, reading some drivel click bait on Facebook?...and you start to doze off?... And you drop your phone and it crashes right into your face? Damn! Wakes me up every time.

                      Gotta get me some blue tech glasses and see if it will help.
                      Better get them safety thickness.

                      Yeah, I second the recommendation of TheraBlue. If your patient absolutely MUST have HEV protection (which is medically, ahem, debatable), TheraBlue is the one that looks most like a normal pair of glasses.
                      I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

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                        #12
                        FYI

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                          #13
                          The first step is to figure out what reason the patient wants/ needs it. If they want a totally clear lens and are experiencing eye strain from digital devices a material filter will work.

                          If they want HEV protection, you need an AR coating or a tinted filter.
                          Have I told you today how much I hate poly?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            How many billions do people spend on health related products that can't even be scientifically proven to help... I. E. Fish oil, ginkgo, herbs and such... The science on blue light filtering is that it does what it says... Let the pt decide if it's worth ordering. The product is really no extra charge in most cases.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by golfnut View Post
                              How many billions do people spend on health related products that can't even be scientifically proven to help... I. E. Fish oil, ginkgo, herbs and such... The science on blue light filtering is that it does what it says... Let the pt decide if it's worth ordering. The product is really no extra charge in most cases.
                              If a consumer walks in and asks for a specific product, that's one thing. But recommending a product to a patient as a doctor or other health care professional is something completely different.

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