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    blue light what to use for a photographer

    Hi all we just had are lab come in and talk to us about blue light.
    What can you do to help a Photographer from blue light? What ever we use can not altar the color for them.
    Any pinput would br great.

    Thanks

    #2
    Find a new lab...

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Uilleann View Post
      Find a new lab...
      What are you selling to help with blue light

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Dave E View Post
        What are you selling to help with blue light
        Dave E, search for threads on HEV you will find that we have hashed this out. Brian is probably feeling a bit blue right now but wait for it...
        I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it. Mark Twain

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          #5
          The more blue you get rid of the yellower the lenses are, it's that simple. If a task requires no departure from "normal" color perception, then you can't eliminate much blue except by moving farther away from the blue emitter and/or turning down the intensity for all wavelengths equally. The flux falls off by the square of the distance from the emitter to the eye.

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            #6
            As simple as that, 100% blue eliminatiom

            Originally posted by Paul Smith LDO View Post

            Dave E, search for threads on HEV you will find that we have hashed this out. Brian is probably feeling a bit blue right now but wait for it...
            As simple as that

            Comment


              #7
              Why not use a wratten filter for the camera? Or is it his eyes he is worried about?
              Lost and confused in an optical wonderland!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by SharonB View Post

                Why not use a wratten filter for the camera? Or is it his eyes he is worried about?
                Good Idea, Sharon. However being a good optician I would assume that he or she could make their own instead of buying one.

                Comment


                  #9
                  No photographer worth their shutterspeed would wear a lens that blocked ANY specific wavelength of visible light. If you suggest such a thing to them you made a bad decision as an optician.

                  The best lens for a photographer is probably CR39 or Trivex with Sapphire, then maybe other lenses with a blue reflex.
                  Whatever AR you choose (and you should) make SURE it is a tough one because looking into camera again and again will scratchem up.

                  EDITED: To sound like less of a jerk.
                  Last edited by Tallboy; 11-19-2015, 03:06 PM.

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                    #10
                    If the patient is insistent on an HEV-addressing product, use TheraBlue. It does not distort visible frequencies appreciably.
                    I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by AngeHamm View Post
                      If the patient is insistent on an HEV-addressing product, use TheraBlue. It does not distort visible frequencies appreciably.
                      You are probably right. Also I have a client who likes rose tinted with AR for her daily wear, but when she is doing photograph she has cr39 Avance. Obviously most patients want one pair to do everything though....

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Tallboy View Post
                        No photographer worth their shutterspeed would wear a lens that blocked ANY specific wavelength of visible light. If you suggest such a thing to them you made a bad decision as an optician.

                        The best lens for a photographer is probably CR39 or Trivex with Sapphire, then maybe other lenses with a blue reflex.
                        Whatever AR you choose (and you should) make SURE it is a tough one because looking into camera again and again will scratchem up.

                        EDITED: To sound like less of a jerk.
                        And here is the ONLY advice you need pay attention to.

                        The fact is simply this: Professional (and many amateur/hobby) photographers want a strictly unaltered view of the world, and as clear and sharp an optic as possible on forward gaze. ANY blue blocking lens on the market today does not allow this. Period.

                        In addition, I would hope they aren't using any of those sort of lenses if they are doing any proof work - particularly print related proofing, for the obvious reasons of altered color.

                        Contacts an option perhaps?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Uilleann View Post
                          Contacts an option perhaps?
                          Contacts are a GREAT option here, if they can give proper correction to this patient! Color distortion or lack thereof aside, glasses are a really annoying barrier between the eye and the camera.
                          I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by AngeHamm View Post
                            Contacts are a GREAT option here, if they can give proper correction to this patient! Color distortion or lack thereof aside, glasses are a really annoying barrier between the eye and the camera.
                            Except most contacts have a light blue visibility tint that are non-optional. Some totally clear are available.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              That is why professional photographers use mostly grey filters.

                              Originally posted by Uilleann View Post

                              And here is the ONLY advice you need pay attention to.

                              The fact is simply this: Professional (and many amateur/hobby) photographers want a strictly unaltered view of the world, and as clear and sharp an optic as possible on forward gaze. ANY blue blocking lens on the market today does not allow this. Period.

                              In addition, I would hope they aren't using any of those sort of lenses if they are doing any proof work - particularly print related proofing, for the obvious reasons of altered color.


                              That is why professional photographers use mostly grey filters.
                              Here is one I know well.





                              See the website: ======>
                              http://www.progreyusa.com

                              when on that website look at the Gallery for some of the best pictures you have ever seen.

                              Last edited by Chris Ryser; 11-20-2015, 01:02 PM.

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