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    #16
    Originally posted by Uilleann View Post
    You don't have to square it with any here per se.

    But the majority of US state legislatures, and the internet completely disagree with you.
    That is the problem within the USA, Washington is a licensed state. There is no national standard for opticianry. Each state has their own criteria. As to how the internet defines me, its an inanimate object and does not collect an annual fee from me in exchange for my license renewal.

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      #17
      Originally posted by CCGREEN View Post
      When I was in High School a gas furnace exploded in my face burning my corneas. I spent a week with both eyes patched so I learned a little bit about how the blind live. That is what sparked my interest in "optical" of some kind.
      I went to college to learn this stuff and of course sat for all the national and state exams more then thirty years ago. So for me it was not by accident that I fell into this field (well maybe it was) but I made a conscious decision to jump into it. I took it on as a Professional trade, careerer not a "job".
      What I have found over the years is that you can learn as much about this profession as you want, learn all the formulas of math that there is. But if you do not use those formulas on a regular basis you will forget them. Then to understand them again you must go look them up and refresh yourself.
      The only ones who use most all the formulas and remember most of the In's and outs of the optical world are the educators of the field. Just how much of a demand is there for those type of people in this field? How often have you shared the formulas and how they work with the general public........most of the public could care less. All they want to do is see and don't care how it happens.
      I'm just saying there is book knowledge that is learned and then forgotten because of lack of use. Then there is practical knowledge that is learned and retained because it is used every day. I dare say that everyone of us who have been around a while have on occasion stood in place with that "deer in the headlights look" or that "senior moment" because we could not recall the information off the top of our head. That does not mean that we are stupid Opticians that just means that there are many different sides of the profession. I have yet to ever find anyone who uses all of them every day.
      You made a choice. I was not talking about YOU! I was describing the majority who did nothing in the 27 states that require a pulse to do what you trained to do. You paid your dues. What you just said in your post is that it takes so little to do what we do we should never learn it in the first place, so why bother? Opticians must have some basis for their existence, and you cannot have it both ways. Either it is a worthy field of endeavor or it is not? If it is, then it should require some level of education and training to analyze Rxs, and do the more complicated things we can do. Unfortunately most can not. Someone comes to you with a problem with an Rx, and I am sure you at least have some idea, where most just guss. I am just at a loss to understand what the hell your post has to do with the train of thought. My opinion is clear......Opticians need to be better educated and trained. If you disagree, then fine. More power to you, but I simply have no idea from your post.

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        #18
        Originally posted by drk View Post
        Any chance optometry schools and colleges (yes, the enemah) can get involved in optician training?
        One school I know of in theSouth had an interest, but nothing came of it. It is a natural fit, and would be a worthy endeavor. Indiana has an Optician/Technician program accredited by the COA and was a good one at one time, and I think stll exists.
        Last edited by wmcdonald; 10-07-2013, 06:46 PM.

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          #19
          Exactly right Uilleann! Unfortunate as it is.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Johns View Post
            It is a professional trade.

            Most of us are highly trained, have high standards and work in a professional environment. Most of us dispense medical devices...contacts, ophthalmic lenses, and frames. (profession)

            We also work with our hands, and often are involved in light manufacturing. (trade)
            Just so there no confusion, I believe the "highly trained" part of the equation should be formal education. Geometric optics, anatomy and physiology, contact lens theory and fitting, and other relevant subjects were all covered (and mastered) before I got involved in the trade portion of the field. I wouldn't have done it any other way. Nothing against anyone that learned OJT, but it wouldn't have worked for me.

            Although I sat for and passed the state of Florida exam, I am now in a state (Ohio) that currently uses an apprentice approach. I am not a fan of apprenticing, but at the very least, I have suggested to the board, and will continue to push for, a law that would require an applicant to pass the ABO BEFORE they could begin their apprenticeship. The way it is now, they've got the cart before the horse.

            Take a month or two, learn the theory, pass the (very) basic ABO test, and THEN begin the journey of becoming an optician.
            Ophthalmic Optician, Society to Advance Opticianry

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              #21
              Formal classroom education should be required. We aren't truly professionals without a degree being required. All states would have to be the same and there couldn't be so many ways around the law- only one licensed per shift, working under the DR's license etc....too many untrained "sales" people making us look bad every day. allowing people with little to no training to do our job makes us all just sales people, the average person does not know the difference- even the untrained sales people don't know the difference, they go through the corporate video training learn how to sell the products corporate deems most profitable and think they know what they are doing. What I witness every day makes me sad and angry. It's. so far from opticianry, I don't really know what it is.

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                #22
                Can't get into it, though I wish I could. But reality is far too clear. They are selling glasses on the internet and disposing with opticianry altogether. It is my solid wish that these estimations presented here are realistic, but I feel foolish about it everytime Coastal's advertisement crosses my computer screen. I believe that what I have learned in my career is useful and valueable but I wonder if rotary phone mechanics felt the same way. And before the lectures start, nobody hopes I'm wrong more than me. The price of a pair of glasses isn't the only thing that has gotten cheap.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by drk View Post
                  Any chance optometry schools and colleges (yes, the enemah) can get involved in optician training?
                  We should talk. I was talking about this just last week.

                  Diane
                  Anything worth doing is worth doing well.

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                    #24
                    Sigh...here we go again.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by Jason H View Post
                      Can't get into it, though I wish I could. But reality is far too clear. They are selling glasses on the internet and disposing with opticianry altogether. It is my solid wish that these estimations presented here are realistic, but I feel foolish about it everytime Coastal's advertisement crosses my computer screen. I believe that what I have learned in my career is useful and valueable but I wonder if rotary phone mechanics felt the same way. And before the lectures start, nobody hopes I'm wrong more than me. The price of a pair of glasses isn't the only thing that has gotten cheap.
                      1. Their will always be "them" and "us". I am sticking with the "us" team.

                      2. I don't feel foolish when I see low prices on my computer screen. Of course, if I were buying glasses online, I would feel foolish, unless I got lucky and the Rx was correct, the frames fit, and everything was in alignment.

                      3. If you were working on rotary phones, hopefully you'd be retired by now, but if not, I would hope that you'd have kept up with the times, and were now working in the IT department. How many mechanics only work on car that have carburetors? Yes, if someone hasn't picked up a book or taken classes since they became an optician, then their career most likely does lack value, and it is devaluing the careers of those they work with, as the workplace is often judged by the lowest denominator.
                      Ophthalmic Optician, Society to Advance Opticianry

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by Judy Canty View Post
                        Sigh...here we go again.
                        I think the advancement of opticianry and different ideas as to how to accomplish that is worth discussing. Each time it is brought up, new ideas are brought out, and I don't think they can be discussed too much. Someone approached me at VEW and said they are beginning to have hope in the future of this profession, and I think it is from continued discussion.

                        Educating OD's? Sure, why not?
                        People against formal education? Let's find out why.
                        Opticianry needs to be branded? Let's have even more ideas.
                        Wages are low? Why?

                        Here we go again!! Yes!!!
                        Ophthalmic Optician, Society to Advance Opticianry

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                          #27
                          Johns, respect your opinion and hope you're right.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Judy Canty View Post
                            Sigh...here we go again.
                            As a sales rep doesn't your value to the practice you serve increase with their decrease in knowledge?

                            I have always found it interesting that people with conflicts of interest in this profession can assume leadership roles and use the title optician, it is the other side of the dumb optician spectrum, the beyond optician. Its the middle of the pack whom I find often has the valid arguments towards what the future should look like.
                            http://www.opticians.cc

                            Creator of the industries 1st HTML5 Browser based tracer software.
                            Creator of the industries 1st Mac tracer software.
                            Creator of the industries 1st Linux tracer software.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by MakeOptics View Post
                              As a sales rep doesn't your value to the practice you serve increase with their decrease in knowledge?

                              I have always found it interesting that people with conflicts of interest in this profession can assume leadership roles and use the title optician, it is the other side of the dumb optician spectrum, the beyond optician. Its the middle of the pack whom I find often has the valid arguments towards what the future should look like.
                              Normally, you're on my ignore list, but here goes. What exactly are you trying to say? That, as a rep, my value is relative to the inexperience of staff? I don't use the title Optician. I have the license and the experience to back it up. Of my 40 years in this industry, only the last 7 have been as a rep. Again, what are you trying to say?

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by Judy Canty View Post
                                Normally, you're on my ignore list, but here goes. What exactly are you trying to say? That, as a rep, my value is relative to the inexperience of staff? I don't use the title Optician. I have the license and the experience to back it up. Of my 40 years in this industry, only the last 7 have been as a rep. Again, what are you trying to say?
                                I'm not looking for a fight, I find that most reps are not interested in an educated optician or even have the optician on their radar. Opticians traditionally are not the largest group of decision makers around, unless you count "no thank you" as a decision.

                                You are a sales representative, if I am not mistaken. It's similar to a lumberjack calling themselves a carpenter, you were a practicing optician and now you're not. I don't understand why my post would make you upset, I called you something beyond optician not the dumb optician or the middle of the road optician. Anyway put me back on your ignore list, thank you.
                                http://www.opticians.cc

                                Creator of the industries 1st HTML5 Browser based tracer software.
                                Creator of the industries 1st Mac tracer software.
                                Creator of the industries 1st Linux tracer software.

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