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Quoting prices on the phone

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    Quoting prices on the phone

    We just got a call this morning. "How much are eye exams? How much are glasses?"

    It's easy to quote a routine eye exam (although that's not always what they need, but nevermind that).

    It's harder for us to quote the cost of glasses. If we're honest, we'd say: "No way to know. We'd have to see what your vision problem is. We have frames from $xxx up. If I give you a number, then you're going to latch on to it."

    In reality, we're not a "price quote over the phone" type of operation. We don't have packages to quote so they can come in and get that price.

    How do you handle this?

    #2
    All our services and prices are posted on our website. We are transparent with all our fees. Only thing that isn't listed is eyeglass lens pricing and contact lens pricing due to myriad of options and the vast assortment of contact lenses.

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      #3
      I give them a range or if they want something a bit more accurate I always tell them ballpark but I make sure I get all the add-ons and rx info first.

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        #4
        I'll give someone the retail price range of the frames, but tell them that the bottom line depends on what lens options they want and whether or not they have insurance. It's not a price over the phone sort of business, really.

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          #5
          People calling and asking prices are usually shopping for a competitively low price or an enticing offer, and will go wherever the deal is. How to handle this depends on: do you want these customers?

          If no, either give your straight up exam and average eyewear pricing, or if your pricing is complicated invite them in for a free custom consultation quote. If they are just deal shoppers that will end the call.

          If yes you do want to bring in some of these shoppers, then have an enticingly priced entry-level or loss-leader deal for exam, glasses, or both. You need to couple this with a boilerplate explanation of the best benefits of buying from you to sweeten the deal, because even your best offer will not beat the competition. The price should be competitive with the retail guys, but can be slightly over as long as you offer good non-monetary incentives (doctor-owned, local small business, skilled certified staff, independent brands, generous replacement guarantees, family-oriented, etc.). This might tip the scales for someone who is shopping not just for the lowest price (those people should already know to shop online or at 'Murca's Worst anyway).
          General advice for any low-priced deal: be prepared for people to take it. 2 pairs of glasses and a free eye exam for $79.95 is the notorious industry loss-leader, and we know that place does everything it can to upsell customers from that deal. But some will stand their ground and take just the bare offer, so whatever you offer make sure it's something you're content with providing if customers don't take you up on the upgrades.​
          www.DanielLivingston.com

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            #6
            We will ask the standard questions about people's insurance, but we do have self-pay exam costs and self-pay frame and lens package prices.
            I'm Andrew Hamm and I approve this message.

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