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Thread: OMG Lenses too thick! Please Help!

  1. #1
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    OMG Lenses too thick! Please Help!

    Hi There!

    Sometime ago I made a post (http://www.optiboard.com/forums/show...097#post105097) asking for some help to buy new glasses. After a long consideration, I decided to buy Stylis 1,67 with Alizé and Transitions. Today my glasses arrived, and I´m shocked!

    I expected a thickness around 4mm in the borders, but it´s a little bit more than 5mm and the aspect is not good. I´m very disappointed with this new glasses, I paid a small fortune for it (here in my country it´s very expensive), and I believe I´ll contact Essilor. My previous glasses used a cheap material and was thinner than this one (4mm on borders). I just can´t believe! Please see below my specs:

    Prescription:
    Right Eye -6,50 Sphere -0,50 Cylinder 160º
    Left Eye -6,25 Sphere -0,50 Cylinderl 45º
    Pupilar Distance 61mm
    Total glasses length: 130mm
    Lenses Height: 30mm
    Lenses length: 50mm
    Nose rim Length: 20mm

    The previous glasses have the same specs, with exception of the sphere, it was -6.00 on both eyes and the lenses was in other format:
    Lenses Height: 35mm
    Lenses Length: 48mm

    I attached some pictures (new and old glasses with a ruler), please see them and give me an opinion. I´m very sad and not sure if I can go on streets wearing this new glasses. :(
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  2. #2
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    Well your new glasses are a completely rimless frame apart from your full wire frame that your old glasses were. That could be one factor as to why your new lenses are as thick as they are.. Check to make sure that the CT on both lenses is not more than 1.5-2.0 mm thick..

  3. #3
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    CT = Center? If so, the center on both lenses is 2-3mm thick. I´m just wondering why the new lenses is 1mm more thick than the old one and I paid 5x more for it, and my prescription increased only -0.25 on Left and -0.50 on Right. Would this small increase be the cause of this?

    Carlos

  4. #4
    Donn McCarthy ABO-AC,NCLEC,CPO OPTIDONN's Avatar
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    I know of a few places that add a little thickness on hi index drill mounts they feel that it adds to the structural integrity. Hi index lenses may have a high tensile strength but they can still snap in half. The extra thickness could be created by the different shape. The further away from the center of the lens the thicker the edges. Are your old and new lenses similar or did they use the exact shape?

  5. #5
    Master OptiBoarder Jedi's Avatar
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    I ran the #'s through the blank thickness calculator on Darryl's website (opticampus.com), and at a 1.5 C.T. there should be 6.0mm E.T. The only way to make a pair thinner for you is to match the frame PD (width + bridge) to you anatomical PD. For example a frame with a 44mm width and a 18mm brdige will generate a 4.1mm E.T.
    "It's not impossible. I used to bull's-eye womp rats in my T-16 back home."


  6. #6
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    So if the width was 6mm lower than what it is the lenses would be 1mm thinner? Is it possible to reduce it on the lenses I already got?

  7. #7
    Optician Extraordinaire
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    What is the material of your new glasses and your old glasses? Material can make a huge difference.

    Your new glasses are slighty stronger and 2 mm wider then your old ones. The 2 mm wider will make your glasses thicker.

  8. #8
    One of the worst people here
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    Quote Originally Posted by Legatinho
    So if the width was 6mm lower than what it is the lenses would be 1mm thinner? Is it possible to reduce it on the lenses I already got?
    basically these ones are thicker because the frame is wider.

    Also, they do not look bad.

  9. #9
    OptiBoard Professional Lewy's Avatar
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    I have to agree, the frame is wider. Look at the difference between the nasal thickness and the temporal. This is down to the amount of decentration required to correctly centre your new spectacles. Also take into account that your previous frame was a full rim, whereby the rim covered 1 to 1.5mm of the lens thickness. Thus because you can see the full edge substance on your new specs you are more aware of them.

    Regards,

    Lewy

    PS There also seems to be a lot of Frontal curve to your new specs, or is it an optical illusion?

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all replys! The new material is Stylis 1,67, and the old material I´m not sure, but I believe it´s polycarbonate (1,59 AirWear?). The only thing I´m sure is about Crizal. It´s present on both lenses. But I paid around $80 on the old lenses and $400 on the new one! A huge difference in price. About the width, I agree the new one is 2mm wider, but I´ve put the 2 lenses side to side and it´s thicker all way long, see for yourself! Even the center looks thicker!

    The only thing I can conclude from this (at least for now):

    1 - It doesn´t matter if you use 1,59 or 1,67 on the material, it won´t affect the thickness, only the price (you pay 5x more for 1,67, at least in my country)

    2 - A small change in Rx play a big rule in thickness. A -0.25 increase in myopia makes your lenses thicker all way long, like seen in the attached picture.

    If I´m wrong in my conclusions, please help me understand what´s wrong. :(

    The pictures are attached!

    Thanks for all your help!

    Carlos
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  11. #11
    One of the worst people here
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    If you are upset quietly go back and ask the optician about them

  12. #12
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    The bevel may give the illusion that your old lenses are thinner than by a larger margin than you may think of your new lenses. Also, like what everybody says, your new frame is wider which will account for thicker edge thickness. And like what everybody said, its a rimeless frame, and a lot of labs will surface and generate a lens a bit thicker to hold more material to be drilled.

  13. #13
    SuperRefractor jtart2's Avatar
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    Tired of lens thickness?

    If you are so tired of wearing thick glasses, why don't you try contact lenses?
    Besides, what's 2 mm as long as the glasses look nice! Your a high myope, for crying out loud!

    If you don't want people to know that you're so nearsighted, wear contact lenses!
    Just my opinion:)

  14. #14
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    Carlos,

    Are you perhaps an engineer by trade? I ask because of the detailed post you made here to outline your problem. This seems like something I have seen some of my engineer patients do. I agree with most of the previous posters, in that the change to rimless is a factor in center thickness, it also does not hide thickness at all. The center thickness that you posted does seem a little on the high side. Are you measuring center thickness with calipers? Or just eyeballing it? The poly can be done to a 1mm center thickness(Airwear) whereas the 1.67 requires a little more to meet minimum safety requirements. The increase in eyesize is not good either, but for the frame you chose, in the size that they were made, you could not likely have done better. That is unless you have the 1.71 Nikon available there. I shudder to think what they would have cost you, and I have only done one set of these in a script like yours (family member of course, generally I would reserve this lens for higher scripts.) and they were truly beautiful lenses. BUT, it was a fully rimmed frame, with an optimized width for the patient. All the index in the world cannot help you if no one is paying attention to the frame that you are choosing. (Sorry for the re-edit, but realized I made an error in my original post)
    Brent
    Last edited by drballen; 08-08-2005 at 10:36 AM.

  15. #15
    Master OptiBoarder
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    I believe your question has been answered with: your old frames are a complete rim and a bit smaller eye size and your new frames are a drilled rimless with a bit larger eye size. That should pretty much explain it.


    Ps. To me, they look good.

  16. #16
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    Yes, my question was properly answered, thank you all. I'll contact the lab who made it and try some sort of agreement. Btw, I don't believe it's thick because the increase in width, neither increase in Rx. The best description of what I believe (and what I'll use as argument to seek an answer from the lab):

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I know of a few places that add a little thickness on hi index drill mounts they feel that it adds to the structural integrity. Hi index lenses may have a high tensile strength but they can still snap in half. The extra thickness could be created by the different shape. The further away from the center of the lens the thicker the edges. Are your old and new lenses similar or did they use the exact shape?
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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