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Thread: TIPS ON DISPENSING

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    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    Redhot Jumper

    The purpose here is to start a thread, that if it works Steve will put in a permanent file. Steve informed me that starting a new forum was difficult with this software as once you do it you cant remove it.The purpose here is to pass along to others all the little tricks of the trade , that has anything to do with dispensing. There are quite a few old timers like myself, Al, Bob and a number of talented opticians of all ages on this board.In light of that i am going to start off with a relatively easy one dealing with the removal of a screw from a metal frame, that wont seem to come out. Quite often if you heat it slightly in a salt pan, then turn it slightly to the right , and then to the left the screw will come out. I am going to try and post at least one new tip a week, until i run out,and i challenge the rest of you to do the same and maybe we can make this a thread to remember

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    OptiBoard Professional Vicki's Avatar
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    This is a great idea and I hope it does become a regular spot.

    One thing I have seen some new people fail to do when adjusting a frame with glass lenses is not loosen the eyewire screw. If you turn the screw a half turn before adjusting the frame you will be less likely to chip the lenses. Basic information but like I said, I've seen some people fail to do this and end up in mess.

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    great idea

    i always find that if you cant figure something out... younger opticians ask older opticians for their suggestion... but the older opticians have to remember to ask the younger opticians also since they may have just learned something !new! in school

    both have great information to share with each other. as a student i had a customer who couldnt see out of his glasses that a 25 year optician had just made, my manager 13 year optician couldnt figure it out... why, he had been wearing r compensated segs for years and not flat tops(hard to notice). i shook my head (these segs are old), redid his glasses and bam they worked and he was happy

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    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Bronze Supporter Joann Raytar's Avatar
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    This one may not be as relevant today as it was a few years ago but ...

    If a tempered glass lens comes out of a heat treat or chem unit with a spot on it, often (not always) a pencil eraser will get it off.

    Now my search for an answer. What is anyone's method for removing a lens from a grooved rimless mount whithout chipping it when it is in there good and extra snug.

    [This message has been edited by Jo (edited 10-30-2000).]

  5. #5

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    Try grabbing the lens with turning pliers and turning it just enough to make a small gap. Then stick your choice of "rimless cord" in the gap and take em out.......

    In cases where the lens is REALLY tight, I have found that it can be easier to cut or break the string....yea I know restringing is no fun, but it beats remaking an expensive lens. (be careful doing this, you can do more harm than good if you use brute strength)

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    Master OptiBoarder Cindy Hamlin's Avatar
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    This is an old favorite for clouded poly lenses. You can soak them in hot Ivory dish liquid for 15-20 minutes and in most cases it will remove the fog.

    Also, when you run out of neutralizer the Ivory dish liquid will remove the tint.

    [This message has been edited by cah2020 (edited 10-30-2000).]

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    sub specie aeternitas Pete Hanlin's Avatar
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    If you ever cut a lens too small in a metal frame (not that that ever happens with today's patternless edgers ;) ), you can sometimes "resize" the frame by grinding down the end of the eyewire at the joint. This works especially well if the frame has a front that hides the joint or if the joint is especially thick to begin with.

    Basically, the tricky part is maintaining the "V" at the end of the eyewire. I've used this little trick once or twice to save an expensive lens. It has its limits, of course, but it does work...

    Pete

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    Here's one I've wanted to try ever since we've posted, " Frame repairs will be performed at the customers risk ".

    Customer comes in for an adjustment on his old ( really old ) heavy, black frames, kinda like what B&L has ( Wayfarers )...The axis was off in one lens...So I take the frame and have them under the hot-air ( don't like using glass beads on plastic frames ) just enough so I can feel the lens turn slightly!....Wham, the frame splits at the bridge and all of sudden I've got two pieces...I told the customer to let me have them for about an hour...cruise the mall, come back in about hour. I drilled two holes at equal distance at the bridge, straightened a paper clip, made a U-hook pattern out of it and threaded the two holes, snipped the excess brushed on a little Lock-Tight and covered the shine with black magic marker!...The mans vision was what it should be; he said the frame felt sturdier than before. He thanked me for a job well done and off he went...I'll never do this again ever, especially with a plastic frame that felt like two thicknesses of a potatoe chip to begin with.

  9. #9
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    Well it looks like we are getting some response here, so heres my tip of the day. if you have a high plus lens, stay away from long narrow frames as they will tend to pop out of those frames the easiest since they are long across the top. one must undersatnd that one of the reasons for having trouble keeping lenses in a metal frame is the eyewire when tightned down has a natural tendency to straighten. you can prove this by taking a piece of string,putting it into an arc and then pulling on both ends. thats what your eyewire does and why there is more problem with plus lenses.

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    This one is pretty basic but an amazing number of "opticians" don't know this. If the temple is too long. Remove the temple tip, cut the desired amount off and replace the tip.

    Next if cables are required, Hilco's cable tips can be applied to any frame metal or plastic as long as it has a metal core. These usually work better than factory cables as they can be custom made to length.

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    As to removing and installing chord mounted rimless glasses. I have found it far easier to insert some 20# test line between the lens and the line in the groove (a opposed to ribbon and fine metalic objects) and use this to pull the line from the groove..

    Also in an effort to make lenses thin, some individuals go too far and do not leave enough thickness on each side of the groove. If it doesn't chip in your hands, it will in patient use. Just ate some over a year old last week for same.

  12. #12
    Master OptiBoarder OptiBoard Bronze Supporter Joann Raytar's Avatar
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    Chip: The 20lb test is a good idea.

    HenryB: I usually hope it is the string that goes before the lens. Actually, that was my reason for posting the question. I know some folks that can pop a tight lens in and out with the flick of a finger. Not me though; I always manage to break the string. Just like I alway manage to flake off the front of 3-piece mounted lenses when tightening. Rimless frames are not my friends.

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    Excellant thread! Glad to see it.

    For nylor frames, I like using a dentist's "explorer". That's the stainless steel torture device with a sharpened hook on one or both ends. It's great for stringing and un-stringing the nylor. BUT you do need to be careful not to scratch the lens or stab yourself. Get them at most hardware or hobby stores or from your dentist.

    Another little trick I use a lot when I dispense progressives to new wearers is to put a LEAP pad with the hole lined up with the center of the reading area. This clearly shows the patient exactly where the center of the reading area is and it serves as a good way to verify the accuracy of the Rx and the placement of the lens.

    Hope someone finds these helpful.
    Keep 'em coming.

    Rich

  14. #14
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    Todays tip is a very basic one, but also the one i see most often that is wrong. When determining if a frame is straight, the first thing you have to look at is to see if it is straight across the front. If it is not, or if one side is bent in more then the other, your 4 point stance means nothing. Quite often you will see frames come in with one temple up and one down and almost invariably the patient will tell you they have one ear higher then the other. For the most part this is a crock. Scientifically it is a fact. In reality the difference in most cases is miniscule. Check the front of the frame and you will probably find its out of alignment.

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    sub specie aeternitas Pete Hanlin's Avatar
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    If you are unsure about whether a patient will tolerate a particular seg height, take a piece of Scotch tape and place it along the seg line. This can be used to show either how much of the lens will be occluded during distance viewing or near viewing.

    Pete

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    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    Patient comes in with an older metal frame that your biggest screw will not stay tight. With the screw in side the barrel take your snipes and gently squeeze the threaded barrel, which will make it a little bit oval, and now the screw will self tap it self. Be careful not to squeeze to hard.

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    Master OptiBoarder Jeff Trail's Avatar
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    I can think of a "few" things that come in handy and really need to get into the habit of doing it :)
    Check OC's and make SURE you take an OC when ordering one lens (that vertical imbalance is a killer)
    If you are in the habit of taking PD's when replacing a lens, then always compare your taken PD to what the person is wearing!
    Keep the layout charts handy and you can show why that certian design will not work in a certian frame.. doing it with the patient sitting there is easier then having to call them back in after the lab calls to tell you it "won't" work.. :)
    If you are ordering one lens only in a PAL.. check to see if prism thinning was used.. also you may want to supply the RX of the other eye just as a refrence for the lab.
    Always (going back to the single lens RX order) supply the base curve of existing as well as OC ...
    Well did my "part" for the day .. anyone else want to add to the list?

    Jeff"do it anyway you want..as long as it's the right way"Trail

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    Arrow

    Sounds silly but if you get into the habit of placing lenses upside-down in the tint pot, you'll never hafta fix an upside-down gradient tint!

  19. #19
    Master OptiBoarder Cindy Hamlin's Avatar
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    For removing AR coatings, there is a product called Armor Etch (for etching glass). It can be purchased at most craft and hobby stores and removes the AR (all but glass) as well as the acid with less risk!

  20. #20
    Master OptiBoarder Texas Ranger's Avatar
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    harry, great thread, where is the inventor of all these tricks, Jaw jah Bob!? Ever have to remove a broken off screw? recently learned from a real old-timer, that if you drip some hot candle wax on it, it makes it really easy to remove.

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    sub specie aeternitas Pete Hanlin's Avatar
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    When ordering bifocals with exceptionally lowered segs (e.g., golfing glasses or just for patient preference), make sure to measure and order the O.C. distance above the seg. If you don't, the O.C. will be placed about 2mm above the seg (which will place it well below the patient's line of sight, and will cause problems- especially with anisometropes).

    Pete

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    Master OptiBoarder Texas Ranger's Avatar
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    Pete, speaking of golf segs, sometimes we do them at the "top", but you have to remember to order the uncut lenses eye for eye backwards.

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    On golf segs. I have often put only one on the top outside corner on the side opposite to that which the ball is addressed.

    Also had some golfers come back and say that they wanted progressives like tier non-golf glasses. Complaint: They could not see the ball properly with out progressives. Putting progressives in same seems to have solved the problem with no come-backs.

  24. #24
    opti-tipster harry a saake's Avatar
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    ok heres another tip to help save the enviorment and what your lab can smell like. Next time your ready to use antifreeze or some commercial coolant, forget it. Go down to Sams club and buy a 5 gallon can of peanut oil. It works with no odor and no chemicals and no corrosion and will last a long time.Probably dont even need an MSDS sheet.

  25. #25
    RETIRED JRS's Avatar
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    Message to Harry A Saake on the ‘peanut oil’ and not needing an MSDS sheet. I’d be careful with that one – people that are allergic to peanuts get deathly ill with airborne peanut molecules, particulates, or whatever there called. Why do you think airlines have (with the exception of SW) quit serving them and switched to Almonds and/or Trail Mix? I’d make real sure about using that stuff freely in an area that potential visitors/clients could be near.
    PS – what do you use antifreeze for?

    Also to Harry A Saake regarding high plus lenses in narrow frames. The reason that frames (high curves) tend to straighten out is directly proportionate to the tracer, or pattern, used to edge. Some devices only measure radii and circumference in what is called ‘flat state’ – non-3D. This will make the ‘A’ measurement too long for the bent frame. Best bet is to bend the frame first, then trace (or cut a pattern whichever way you do it) and then the ‘A’ measurement will be in alignment with the physical dimensions of the frame. You can also correct for this manually, by edging slightly large, then sizing by only removing the excess along the long dimension – the 180 or ‘A’ length.

    Message to Pete Hanlin regarding the OC heights on low segs. If the lab is using a good computer system, it should NOT arbitrarily place the OC that close to the seg. Common practice is to place the VOC vertically centered unless specified by the account. Labs that hold a predetermined VOC placement are not doing you or your clients a service – it just makes it easier for the lab. Ever get lenses manufactured that way and notice how either the top or bottom is thicker than the opposing side? By default (with the exception of Progressives and Exec’s) the thickness should be equal (barring any prescribed prism).

    Just a couple of comments – enjoyed the postings.

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